Search Results for: literaturegeek.com

From the resource: Successful non-traditional dissertations include a comic book (Nick Sousanis), a hip-hop album (A.D. Carson), code and design without written chapters (me), and the use of digital formats and methods such as a Tumblog counter-narrative (Jade E. Davis) or topic modeling (Lisa Rhody). Are you curious about using digital methods or forms to…

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I’m designing a digital humanities (DH) initiative here at the Purdue University Libraries, and “initiative” means our whole vision for DH, support for which is now enshrined as a specific point in our department strategic policy. To kick off a series of blog posts covering this infrastructure and community design work I’ve been up to,…

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Tech tutorials and documentation are a particularly exciting place for inline annotation, since users can indicate exactly where they got stuck or need additional information. Using the #DHannotates hashtag, we’re encouraging digital humanists to annotate tutorials, documentation, and other DHy webpages as an easy way of improving these resources for the whole community. Hypothesis annotation…

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What if we build a digital edition and everyone (millions of scholars, first-time readers, book clubs, teachers and their students) shows up and annotates the text with their infinite interpretations, questions, and contextualizations? The “Infinite Ulysses” project pursues this speculative experiment, and today I’m going to talk about how this unlikely hypothetical is helping me…

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Some reasons graduate students (and any scholars) should maintain an online presence, with an emphasis on using Twitter and blogging to develop intellectually and professionally: Blogging is magic (I’m blogging right now!). Blogging can help you develop content for your dissertation, article, or future conference paper, without the same constraints of sitting down to produce…

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How do you conduct a speculative experiment around a digital humanities tool, while also creating something that’s useful to readers and scholars right now? I’ve been using a site policy on tagging to test the differences between my speculative design and the probable reality of my site’s use. Read the full post here.

Who holds the intellectual property (IP) rights to your digital dissertation? In my case, the answer is complicated, involving multiple licenses and stakeholders. Digital humanities productions brings new licensing concerns to the humanities. Our pre-digital discussions around IP usually centered around book contracts and open-access journals; rights claims from any agency that funds you during…

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For this year’s Bloomsday, Rhonda Armstrong, Regina Higgins, Steven Hoelscher, Pamela Andrews and I collaborated digitally to extend the Ulysses dataset and visualization work begun at THATCamp Prime 2012 (aka Bloomsday 2012). Rhonda, Regina, Steven, and Pamela each thoroughly scoured ten pages of the book to add to our knowledge about the network of character…

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