Author: Amanda Morton

CFParticipation: Epoiesen – Call for Respondents

From the post:

I’m hoping to get Epoiesen unveiled in time for the autumn. You remember Epoiesen . Part of the idea is that we don’t do traditional peer review, but rather ask reviewers to be ‘Respondents’, who react to the piece in a short creative work on their own. We seek out at least two ‘Respondents’ (ideally) for every submission. The ‘Responding to…’ will itself be published with its own citation, DOI, etc. A response explores how the piece moves the responder, or puzzles her, or sparks new thoughts – a ‘Response’ is meant to become the starting point for a larger discussion that would take place via the site’s annotation framework (readers can annotate any piece of text on the site using Hypothes.is), across the blogosphere, and beyond.

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CFParticipation: Online Roundtable Discussion – Digital Scholarship and Library Publishing

From the post:

How can we support scholars in creating complex digital products? What does library publishing bring to the table in this area? How does unique digital scholarship fit into our strategies for scalability and sustainability? What does it mean to ‘publish’ a digital scholarship project, anyway? Please join us for an exploratory conversation about the current digital scholarship landscape, the opportunities for library publishers, and the needs of scholars and librarians related to this emerging area of practice.

When: Thursday, July 20th, 3:00-4:00pm EDT Call-in Info: RSVP to receive call-in info

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Job: Head of Digital Research, UK National Archives

From the ad:

The National Archives has set itself the ambition of becoming a digital archive by instinct and design. The digital strategy takes this forward through the notion of a disruptive archive which positively reimagines established archival practice, and develops new ways of solving core digital challenges. You will develop a research programme to progress this vision, to answer key questions for TNA and the Archives Sector around digital archival practice and delivery. You will understand and navigate through the funding landscape, identifying key funders (RCUK and others) to build relations at a senior level to articulate priorities around digital archiving, whilst taking a key role in coordinating digitally focused research bids.

Read the full ad here.

Resource: Programming Historian Highlights from the First Half of 2017

From the post:

The first half of 2017 is already coming to an end, and we thought it would be a great time to highlight the new lessons that have been published in the past six months.

The big story has been the tremendous success of our Spanish Language Team, Maria José Afanador-Llach, Victor Gayol, and Antonio Rojas Castro, who have translated 25 tutorials into Spanish. This ongoing work has been a massive undertaking, and a tremendous coordinated effort by the Spanish Team and the growing network of reviewers who have contributed to the success of the translation.

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Editors’ Choice: Ways to Compute Topics over Time, Part 1

Creative Commons image by vial3tt3 via Flickr

This is the first in a series of posts which constitute a “lit review” of sorts to document the range of methods scholars are using to compute the distribution of topics over time.

Graphs of topic prevalence over time are some of the most ubiquitous in digital humanities discussions of topic modeling. They are used as a mechanism for identifying spikes in discourse and for depicting the relationship between the various discourses in a corpus.

Topic prevalence over time is not, however, a measure that is returned with the standard modeling tools such as MALLET or Gensim. Instead, it is computed after the fact by combining the model data with external metadata and aggregating the model results. And, as it turns out, there are a number of ways that the data can be aggregated and displayed.

In this series of notebooks, I am looking at 4 different strategies for computing topic significance over time.

 

Read the full post here.

Editors’ Choice: Building Capacity for Digital Humanities – A Framework for Institutional Planning

Creative Commons image by James F. Clay via Flickr

A growing number of researchers in the humanities are using computational tools and methods that are more typically associated with social and scientific research. These tools and techniques enable researchers to pursue new forms of inquiry and new questions and bring more attention to—and cultivate broader interest in—traditional humanities and humanities data. This paper from ECAR and the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) outlines a practical framework for capacity building to develop institutional digital humanities support for IT staff, librarians, administrators, and faculty with administrative responsibilities.

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Job: Associate University Librarian for Scholarly Resources, UC Davis

From the ad:

The Associate University Librarian (AUL) for Scholarly Resources is the leader most directly responsible for the complete spectrum of activities supporting provision of scholarly resources to researchers, faculty, and students. The incumbent is central to leadership of innovative programs in scholarly content development and management in support of the university’s mission, including through direct supervision of four department heads responsible for strategic, evidence-based scholarly resource development and evaluation, acquisition and management, delivery and access, and data and digital scholarship. In particular, the AUL advocates for and advances progressive and innovative conceptions of library scholarly resources, data (including linked data), and digital institutional assets, as well as reframing of library information management and infrastructure, including metadata creation and data management.

Read full ad here.

Job: Specialist, Digital Humanities at University of Nevada, Reno

From the ad:

The University of Nevada, Reno is recruiting for a Digital Humanities Specialist, in conjunction with the Digital Initiatives Librarian. The incumbent will build and maintain the library digital collections and support faculty, staff, and students to find innovative ways to organize and creatively curate research online. This position will be responsible for the digitization and interactive curation of digital collections and/or exhibits by using a variety of technologies and experiential online formats. The position will also create, edit, or enhance metadata for primary resources added to library digital collections which will require the candidate to have excellent researching skills. In addition to updating UNR Library collections to become fully digitized and curated online, this position will support library efforts to support digital projects created by UNR faculty and students.

Read full ad here.

Funding: Gerda Henkel Fellowship for Digital History

From the posting:

With the generous support of the Gerda Henkel Foundation, the German Historical Institute (GHI) and the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at the George Mason University (RRCHNM) invite applications from postdoctoral scholars and advanced doctoral students for a 12-month fellowship in digital history.

Over the last few years there has been a stunning growth of new and exciting digital tools and methods that have the potential to augment and revolutionize traditional historical research. Historians have turned to data mining, GIS, and social network analysis—to name just a few new digital tools—to analyze source material in innovative ways and to provide unique insights for their research. Scholars increasingly need to develop their own familiarly and facility with these new digital tools and approaches in order to take advantage of their potential for their research. As a means to build out that capacity, this fellowship is intended scholars who are perhaps new to digital history but are interested in developing new skills and methods that could aid their research as well as to support junior scholars already working in the field of digital history. Additionally, the fellowship aims to connect scholars from Europe to the digital history landscape in the United States.

Read more here.

Report: Latest Success Story! Medieval Handwriting and Handwritten Text Recognition

From “Latest Success Story! Medieval Handwriting and Handwritten Text Recognition”:

Two partners in the READ project network have now successfully trained a new model to recognise Gothic handwriting!  The State Archives of Zurich (READ project partner) and the University of Zurich (READ project Memorandum of Understanding partner) have collaborated on the automatic recognition of a collection of medieval charters.

In 1336 a cartulary was written in Königsfelden, close to the city of Brugg (which is now part of Switzerland).  Königsfelden abbey was a well-endowed institution with close ties to the dukes of Habsburg.  In a neat and regular handwriting, the charters of the institution were copied on roughly 260 parchment pages. The cartulary is available online via e-codices.

At the University of Zurich, there is an ongoing project to create a digital scholarly edition of the charters of Königsfelden abbey.  The cartulary is an important source for early writing practices and has already been partially transcribed. The project team have been using our Transkribus platform to produce their transcriptions and they used these transcripts to train and test a Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) model.

Read the full post here.