Author: gfranzini

CFP: AIUCD 2019 – Italian Conference of Digital Humanities

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From the CFP:

The main topic of the AIUCD 2019 Conference is ‘Pedagogy, teaching, and research in the age of Digital Humanities’. The conference aims at reflecting on the new possibilities that the digital yields for pedagogy, teaching, and scholarly research: how will these transform teaching in the humanities? What contributions can humanistic cultural critique offer to the digital revolution? What is the connection with the digitization plan for Universities outlined by the Ministry? It also concerns the Digital Humanities as a new discipline, and this brings forward further considerations: how can the new professional figure of the digital humanist be developed? Which areas of knowledge define the Digital Humanities as a subject of study, research, and teaching? How can we recognise, classify, describe, and evaluate research efforts in the Digital Humanities?

Read the full CFP here.

Editors’ Choice: Recognizing Women Historians’ Expertise – An Interview with the Co-Founders of Women Also Know History

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Interview by Marilou Tanguay[1], Florence Prévost-Grégoire[2] and Catherine Larochelle[3] with Emily Prifogle and Karin Wulf, two of the co-founders of Women Also Know History. This interview was originally published in French on HistoireEngagee.ca.

Last June, the historians behind the Twitter account and the hashtag #womenalsoknowhistory launched a website aimed at increasing the dissemination and use of the expertise and publications of women historians. The initiative, conceived as a way of countering the gender bias of historical discipline, is aimed at both history practitioners and journalists wishing to interview experts in the field. Since the launch of their website, almost 3,000 historians have created a profile.

As Quebecois historians working in Canada and Europe, we learned about this initiative through Twitter. The issues surrounding women’s place in academia have preoccupied us for a couple of years. Over the past few months we have begun to more intentionally investigate these questions. At HistoireEngagée.ca we have a series named “Où sont les femmes?” (“Where are the women?”) aimed at addressing links between women, the discipline of history and the narratives it produces. The launch of Women Also Know History was a key moment for us to reflect on these issues.

To learn more about this project, which is still little-known in Quebec and in the French-speaking world, we interviewed two of the co-founders, Emily Prifogle and Karin Wulf, about its beginnings, its impacts and their hopes for how this database will work to eliminate sexist bias in the practice and dissemination of history.

When and why did you get the idea for this database? What was the intention behind this initiative?

Emily Prifogle: The idea for the database comes from the Women Also Know Stuff initiative created by women in political science. It inspired us to create something similar for historians in 2017. From the beginning, the overarching goal of the project has been to find concrete ways to promote and support the work of women historians as a way of addressing gender bias.

Karin Wulf:  The idea originated in the evidence of ongoing gender bias in history—although there has been progress in this area the more obvious examples of “best book” lists and awards, keynotes, syllabi, the Barnes & Noble book tables—there are too many examples to list.  And of course, there are many forms of bias and exclusion, but having seen the success of Women Also Know Stuff and talked with some of their founding group the time seemed right for a similar initiative for history.

 

Read the full post here.

Job: Head of Scholarly Communications at Emory University

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From the ad:

Reporting to the Director, Research, Engagement, and Scholarly Communications, the Head of Scholarly Communications leads the Scholarly Communications Office (SCO) and has leadership, management, policy, planning, and advocacy responsibilities for scholarly communications for all Emory libraries, including promoting scholarly repositories and scholarly communications services to the Emory community. Scholarly communications advocacy and services include contributing to the evolution of scholarly publishing and research data management practices in the academy; copyright guidance, advocacy and policy development for the creation, use, and re-use of content in all formats; open access advocacy and policy development, including management of funds to promote open access publishing and open data distribution; and promoting open access and data repositories in support of the library’s and university’s educational and research mission.

Read more here.

 

Resource: An Archive of 8,000 Benjamin Franklin Papers Now Digitized & Put Online

From the post:

Let me quickly pass along some good news from the Library of Congress: “The papers of American scientist, statesman and diplomat Benjamin Franklin have been digitized and are now available online for the first time…. The Franklin papers consist of approximately 8,000 items mostly dating from the 1770s and 1780s. These include the petition that the First Continental Congress sent to Franklin, then a colonial diplomat in London, to deliver to King George III; letterbooks Franklin kept as he negotiated the Treaty of Paris that ended the Revolutionary War; drafts of the treaty; notes documenting his scientific observations, and correspondence with fellow scientists.”

Read more here.

Job: Supervisor, Library Applications Programming at University of Oregon

From the ad:

The Supervisor, Library Applications Programming, provides high level technical leadership, management and direction in planning, developing and maintaining the library’s public and staff Web environment and applications to support library workflows and services. The Supervisor supervises the programming staff of the Application Development & Integration team (ADI), coordinates needs assessment, design, testing, maintenance and support of a wide variety of library applications, working to ensure compliance with accessibility guidelines and standards.

Read more here.

Job: Metadata Product Manager, California Digital Library

From the ad:

The Metadata Product Manager provides product management and metadata strategy experience in support of the CDL’s Discovery & Delivery (D2D) program goals. In close coordination with the D2D technical team manager and D2D product management supervisor, lead a team of developers and analysts. Overall product management responsibility for Zephir, a custom metadata management service provided to the HathiTrust Digital Library. Assess and advise on metadata strategies for consortial data workflows and data integrity, collection analysis, and discovery and delivery services. Collaborate with CDL product managers, service owners, leadership, and with analysts and other staff in organizations external to CDL, such as vendors and cross-institutional partnerships, to achieve D2D goals. Maintain awareness of new technology and digital library industry trends, and identify opportunities for improvement of current services, or the creation of new services based on a deep commitment to addressing stakeholder and end user needs.

Read more here.

Job: Director, Arts & Humanities Research Computing, Harvard University

From the ad :

Harvard University Information Technology (HUIT) is a community of Information Technology professionals committed to understanding our users and devoted to making it easier for faculty, students, and staff to teach, research, learn, and work through the effective use of information technology. We are recruiting an IT workforce that has both breadth in their ability to collaborate and innovate across disciplines – and depth in specific areas of expertise. HUIT offers opportunities for IT professionals to learn and work in a unique technology landscape and service-focused environment. If you are a technically proficient, nimble, user-focused and accountable IT professional who also connects with the importance of collaborating well in a team environment we are looking for you!

Read more here.

CFP: ACRL 2019 Conference – “Recasting the Narrative”

From the CFP:

ACRL 2019 contributed paper, panel session, preconference, and workshop proposals are due May 4, 2018.  Submit proposals via the online form available on the conference website. Learn about the overall process, see examples of successful proposals, and discover ways to strengthen your proposal submission in this webcast featuring members of the ACRL 2019 Conference Committee.

Read more here.

Editors’ Choice: Teaching Machines, or How the Automation of Education Became ‘Personalized Learning’

This is the transcript of the talk I gave this evening at the CUNY Graduate Center. 

…I do want to talk a little bit this evening about the work I’ve been doing as a Spencer Fellow. That’s not what it says in my title and abstract, I recognize. And that’s the curse of making up titles and abstracts in advance: sometimes you sit down to prepare a talk and realize you really want to say something else entirely, and so your task becomes trying to thread things all together so that no one who shows up expressly to hear you expand on the ideas advertised on the flyer is too frustrated or disappointed…

I love old teaching machines, yes even BF Skinner’s teaching machines, despite their deeply problematic usage. I love them, in part, because they are objects. These objects carry a history. They reflect an ideology. They have substance. They have weight – literally, culturally, intellectually, politically. They are material artifacts, and we can talk about how they were made, how they were manufactured. And that seems particularly important, that materiality. It helps us see design and functionality and production and history and even ideology in ways that I think today’s digital teaching machines and teaching machine-makers are more than happy to obscure.

Read full post here.

Conference: Global Digital Humanities Symposium

From the post:

Digital Humanities at Michigan State University is proud to continue its symposium series on Global DH into its third year. We are delighted to feature speakers from around the world, as well as expertise and work from faculty and students at Michigan State University in this two day symposium…Registration Closes March 9!

Read the program here.