Author: Author on Source

Job: Digital Humanist, The Long 19th Amendment Project

From the ad:

The Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University seeks a Digital Humanist committed to promoting feminist scholarship within the digital humanities to create a portal documenting the complexities and aftermath of the women’s suffrage movement as part of The Long 19th Amendment Project. The Digital Humanist will report to the Manager for Special Projects & Digital Services and will collaborate closely with the project steering committee and Digital Services staff.

Read more here.

Job: Senior Digital Library Software Engineer at Harvard University

From the ad:

Library Technology Services is seeking a senior software engineer to assist in the building of modern web systems for our digital library solutions.  The ideal candidate will have skills in Angular, JavaScript, HTML and CSS to build modern web interfaces for our digital library solutions.  The ability to quickly prototype both frontend and backend systems is a must.   Working closely with our UI specialist to ensure conformance to library standards and accessibility requirements, will be part of ensuring that work meets organizational requirements.  The expectation is that this individual will have strong communication skills, the ability to design sites quickly and build prototypes rapidly to be reviewed during agile meetings and is able to work independently with little direction.

Read more here.

Announcement: Introducing ZoteroBib

From the post:

We think Zotero is the best tool for almost anyone doing serious research, but we know that a lot of people — including many students — don’t need all of Zotero’s power just to create the occasional bibliography. Today, we’re introducing ZoteroBib, a free service to help people quickly create perfect bibliographies. Powered by the same technology behind Zotero, ZoteroBib lets you seamlessly add items from across the web — using Zotero’s unmatched metadata extraction abilities — and generate bibliographies in more than 9,000 citation styles. There’s no software to install or account to create, and it works on any device, including tablets and phones. Your bibliography is stored right on your device — in your browser’s local storage — unless you create a version to share or load elsewhere, so your data remains entirely under your control.

Read more here.

Job: Digital Humanities Developer

From the ad:

The Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and CMU’s Digital Scholarship Center (dSHARP) seeks an experienced Digital Humanities (DH) Developer to collaborate on experimental interdisciplinary projects. This hire is part of a long-term initiative to foster digital humanities research at CMU. The DH Developer will work alongside researchers from Dietrich and elsewhere to plan and implement digital humanities projects, from statistical analyses of millions of legal documents to websites that crowdsource grammars of endangered languages. Located in CMU Libraries and under the supervision of CMU Library’s Program Director of Digital Humanities, the developer will be a generalist who can start up faculty projects into functioning prototypes capable of securing their own funding and external development support.

Read more here.

Editors’ Choice: Soon You May Be Able to Text with 2,000 Egyptian Hieroglyphs

Led by Unicode Consortium member Michel Suignard, the proposed Hieroglyphs will add over 2,000 new glyphs to the current Unicode standards. It will also provide greater global standardization and ease of use for Egyptologists through a searchable Hieroglyphs database. Over 2,000 new Hieroglyphs may soon be available for use on cell phones, computers, and other digital devices. The Unicode Consortium recently released a revised draft of standards for encoding Egyptian Hieroglyphs. If approved, the available Hieroglyphs will provide greater access and global uniformity for Egyptologists, covering a much longer period of Hieroglyphic usage than ever before. The proposal is part of a larger effort between the Unicode Consortium, ancient linguists, font designers, and the federal government to attempt to study, preserve, and then digitally represent ancient and endangered languages through the use of computer code.

Read more here.

Editors’ Choice: How the EU’s Copyright Reform Threatens Open Source

A picture of a filing cabinet.

Open Source and copyright are intimately related. It was Richard Stallman’s clever hack of copyright law that created the General Public License (GPL) and, thus, free software. The GPL requires those who copy or modify software released under it to pass on the four freedoms. If they don’t, they break the terms of the GPL and lose legal protection for their copies and modifications. In other words, the harsh penalties for copyright infringement are used to ensure that people can share freely.

Despite the use of copyright law to police the GPL and all the other open source licenses, copyright is not usually so benign. That’s not surprising: copyright is an intellectual monopoly. In general, it seeks to prevent sharing—not to promote it. As a result, the ambitions of the copyright industry tend to work against the aspirations of the Open Source world.

Read the post here.

CFP: Call for Chapters – Access, Control, and Dissemination in Digital Humanities

From the post:

While DH is seen by some as especially interdisciplinary or more conducive to group work, linked data, and open research, including both access to results and participation in research itself, the very nature of its connectedness creates challenges for researchers who wish to assert control of data, have some role in how data is used or how work is acknowledged, and how it is attributed and recorded. Researchers involved in any substantial DH project must confront similar questions: who should be allowed to make reproductions of artifacts, which ones, how many, how often, of what quality and at what cost, what are the rights of possession and reproduction, including access, copyright, intellectual property rights or digital rights management. Given the potential of open and accessible data, it is sometimes suggested that DH might be a much-needed bridge between ivory tower institutions and the general public. The promise of DH in this regard, however, still remains in many ways unfulfilled, raising the question of who DH is for, if not solely for bodies of like-minded academics.

Read more here.

CFP: Teaching and Research with Archives

From the post:

As an open-access journal comprised of educators, scholars, and librarians deeply committed to studying how knowledge is produced, preserved, and circulated, the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy is thrilled to announce a special themed issue on archives. Digital technologies have prompted renewed attention to archival research and teaching practices, creating new opportunities for engaging primary sources, while also raising ethical questions about how archives are created, organized, shared, accessed, and preserved.

Read more here.

Editors’ Choice: Evaluating Digital Humanities Beyond the Tenure Track

This post (and its partner post on Evaluating Digital Humanities Beyond the Tenure Track Part 2: For Employers) continues a series of blog posts from the MLA Committee on Information Technology about evaluating work in the digital humanities. (See Amanda Visconti’s post on digital dissertations and Shawna Ross’s explanation for the series.) I’ve taken on the task of writing about evaluating the work of “alt-ac” and other digital humanities professionals not working in traditional tenure-track roles.

To a great extent, evaluating the work of these positions is the same as evaluating the work of anyone else–good scholarship is good scholarship, from any source. But the less-charted paths of Digital Scholarship Specialists and Digital Humanities Librarians can lead to some specific issues and points of tension, which I want to address here. I think there’s a lot more discussion to be had on these issues as we work towards fuller guidelines, and I’m hoping this will be only the first part of the conversation.

Read the full post here.

Job: TPH Co-Editor/NCPH Digital Media Editor

From the ad:

We are pleased to invite applications for a full-time staff position at MARCH, located in the Cooper Street Historic District on the campus of Rutgers-Camden. The primary responsibility of the Public Historian in Residence will be to serve as co-editor of The Public Historian, the journal of the National Council on Public History (NCPH) and as Digital Media Editor for NCPH. The individual hired will be expected to provide, in particular, the perspective of a public history practitioner and to facilitate connections between the journal and NCPH’s various digital publications and venues, such as the blog.

Read more here.