Author: Author on Source

Laura Crossley is a Digital History Fellow at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media and a Ph.D. student in the Department of History at George Mason University.

CFP: Utah Symposium on the Digital Humanities 2019

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From the CFP:

The fourth Utah Symposium on the Digital Humanities continues conversations that have taken place at earlier DHU conferences. It enables scholars in Utah and neighboring regions to dwell further on issues that are of concern to the digital humanities.

DHU4 explores the links and intersections which join humans, machines, and disparate vocational cultures. These links are central to Utah’s own history. In 1861, in Salt Lake City, Western Union linked together the nation with the transcontinental telegraph. In 1869, the “golden spike” joined the two halves of the transcontinental railroad. A century later, in 1969, the University of Utah became the fourth node or intersection of the Arpanet. For the anniversary year of 2019, in conjunction with the second annual Lingofest conference, we aim to expand, deepen, and examine the connections between people who work in, and reflect on, the digital culture that has emerged in concert with these networks.

Read the full CFP here.

Job: Assistant/Associate Professor of History (Digital History), Penn State

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From the ad:

The Pennsylvania State University, Department of History invites applications for a tenured or tenure-track position in digital history with a specialization in any field. The appointment will be made at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor, depending upon qualifications, and will begin in August 2019. The successful applicant should be able to: demonstrate an active research agenda that engages digital humanities methodologies; enhance the graduate and undergraduate curricula; contribute immediately to both graduate and undergraduate teaching in the department; and help to launch and participate in Penn State’s new Digital Humanities minor in the College of the Liberal Arts. The candidate must have a Ph.D. in hand at the time of application. Prospective candidates should submit a curriculum vitae, a letter of application that describes current and future research, evidence of teaching effectiveness, evidence of digital history scholarship, and the names and contact information of three references. Applications may also include up to three offprints or unpublished papers or chapters. Review of applications will begin on December 1, 2018 and continue until the position is filled.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Open Educational Technology Specialist (Two Vacancies), CUNY

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From the ad:

The TLC and GCDI seek two Open Educational Technology Specialists who will work on programming related to CUNY’s institutional investment in Open Educational Resources (OER). Beginning in 2017 and continuing into the upcoming academic year, New York State has made significant investments in supporting the development, deployment, and integration of OER across the curriculum, saving CUNY students more than $8m in the first year of the initiative alone.

CUNY faculty have expressed desire to host OER and to stage student engagement with them on CUNY-built and maintained platforms. Two such platforms are supported at The Graduate Center: the CUNY Academic Commons (CAC) and Manifold Scholarship. The Open Educational Technology Specialists will support faculty and staff from across CUNY who are doing OER-related work on these platforms.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Web Developer, Modern Language Association

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From the ad:

The Modern Language Association (MLA) is seeking a full-stack PHP developer to extend and maintain several open-source software products. These include the WordPress-based MLA Commons, which includes The MLA Style Center and the MLA Action Network, as well as Humanities Commons and Humanities CORE, which allow humanities scholars to create profiles, seek feedback from peers on their work, establish and join groups to discuss common interests, and collaborate through new kinds of open-access publications. This is an extraordinary opportunity to contribute to an award-winning and active open-source project (see GitHub) and to help shape the strategic direction of the leading membership association in the humanities as we seek to expand the scope of our outreach and develop new ways to serve humanities scholars.

Read the full ad here.

Announcement: ReSounding the Archives has launched!

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From the announcement:

This interdisciplinary project bridges digital humanities, history, and music by bringing historic sheet music back to life through digitization of sheet music, performance of each piece, and student research about each piece. The website makes all of these resources freely available for use by students, teachers, researchers, and public audiences under a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC 4.0).

Read the full announcement here.

Editors’ Choice: How do we model stereotypes without stereotyping?

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We recently put out a paper on how racial bias functions in Hollywood films. This work was based on a few studies that came before it, namely this one, from USC Annenberg. We presented numerical analyses like the number of characters in different racial and ethnic groups and the number of words spoken by these groups, as well as who occupied the top roles in these films. These numbers give us tangible measures of the visual aspects of these films, but they exclude the entire other half of film: dialogue. We wanted to take this research a step further from other studies, aiming to learn more about racial bias in casting and writing through an analytical study of the dialogue spoken by these characters, to analyze the actual “quality” of the language as a stand-in for the “quality” of a role, and to answer questions like, are people of colour being relegated to the same kinds of roles in the disproportionately few times that they do appear on screen?

This was, predictably, much more difficult to carry out than we had initially thought when we started out last summer.

Using text mining and computational methods, the goal of this aspect of the study was to distance ourselves from any kind of subjective, close interpretation of the dialogue. One way we were able to do this is laid out in the paper. We found that characters who’s racial or ethnic identity could be mapped to a corresponding geographical location (e.g., Latinx characters and Latin America) were more likely to reference cities and countries in that region than white characters were.

This was a relatively straightforward and objective measure. We tried to present it equally objectively and not pull any far-fetched analyses from it. We felt comfortable putting this into our paper without causing any controversy. But we wanted to do more, and try to see whether, on a measurable, linguistic level, people of colour are pigeon-holed in ways that their white counterparts are not.

Read the full post here.

Job: Assistant Professor of American Literature, St. Mary’s University

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From the ad:

Do you like to teach outside of the traditional confines of period focused classes? Are you interested in creating fresh, inventive courses that include community-based education or the digital humanities?

The Department of English Literature and Language, St. Mary’s University, San Antonio, Texas, invites you to apply for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor beginning Fall 2019 in American Literature. Teaching responsibilities include courses in core literature, composition, and upper-division and master’s level courses. We are looking for someone conversant in digital pedagogies, project-based learning, and interdisciplinary interest in contributing to our Center for Catholic Studies.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Assistant Professor, Fiction Writing (Digital Humanities), SIU Carbondale

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From the ad:

Professor, Fiction Writing (Digital Humanities), tenure track, continuing, 9-month appointment, Department of English, SIU Carbondale.

Qualifications: Completed MFA in fiction, and/or PhD in Creative Writing (fiction). Candidates must have at least one published or accepted book of fiction, and must have experience teaching fiction writing classes, preferably at both undergraduate and graduate levels. Candidates must also show preparation to contribute, via teaching and/or creative activity, to an emerging program in digital humanities, broadly-defined: podcasts, VR narratives, game scripting, blogging, and/or other forms of online/digital publication.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Assistant Professor, Public & Applied Humanities, University of Arizona

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From the ad:

The Department of Public & Applied Humanities at the University of Arizona is seeking a tenure-track Assistant Professor. The top candidate will be able to contribute expertise, leadership, and imagination to the department’s efforts to theorize and prefigure responses to the future of the human being.

Candidates should be highly collaborative, exploratory, and hardworking, with a humanities-oriented research specialization in one or more of the following areas: the environment (natural or built), fabrication (material, biological, electronic), health (cellular, systemic, societal), technology (digital, analog, biological), or storytelling (place-based and/or digital). Experience with and an understanding of international and/or foreign language content creation, or Indigenous/First Nations/Native lifeways will be of particular interest given the Department’s institutional and geographic location.

Read the full ad here.

Resource: Google Dataset Search

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About the resource:

Similar to how Google Scholar works, Dataset Search lets you find datasets wherever they’re hosted, whether it’s a publisher’s site, a digital library, or an author’s personal web page. To create Dataset search, we developed guidelines for dataset providers to describe their data in a way that Google (and other search engines) can better understand the content of their pages. These guidelines include  salient information about datasets: who created the dataset, when it was published, how the data was collected, what the terms are for using the data, etc. We then collect and link this information, analyze where different versions of the same dataset might be, and find publications that may be describing or discussing the dataset.

Read more here.