Author: Author on Source

Laura Crossley is a Digital History Fellow at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media and a Ph.D. student in the Department of History at George Mason University.

Job: Digital Scholarship & Open Educational Resources Librarian, SUNY Maritime College

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From the ad:

The Digital Scholarship and Open Educational Resources Librarian supports the service portfolio of the Library by providing client service, technical expertise, training, and support for tools and practices used by faculty, researchers, students, librarians, and other partners engaged with digital scholarship and publishing. The position also coordinates the College’s Open Educational Resource initiatives as a way to reduce the cost of higher education and improve student success. The Digital Scholarship and Open Educational Resources Librarian will contribute towards the vision and development of forthcoming initiatives, including a center to support digital scholarship, and provide a more cohesive and holistic service environment for scholars.

Read the full ad here.

Job: History Post-Doctoral Research Associate, Living with Machines Project

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From the ad:

As a Post-Doctoral Research Associate (RA) on the Living with Machines Project you will work closely with the project PI (Dr Ruth Ahnert), Co-Is (Prof. Emma Griffin and Prof. Jon Lawrence) and the wider inter-disciplinary team based at the Institute and the British Library in the construction and historical interrogation of the project’s ambitious digitized source base. You will have the opportunity to develop your digital skills and play an active part in all aspects of research from data collection, through analysis to writing up and publication. This is a collaborative research role and there is an expectation that you will play an active part in the team based at the Alan Turing Institute. Your appointment will be until April 2021, with the possibility of renewal for a further two years (funding permitting).

Read the full ad here.

Resource: Getting Ready for Teaching this Fall

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From the resource:

I just got back from Digital Pedagogy Lab, a week full of people sharing resources that can be implemented in our classes, if we start thinking about it [looks at calendar – weeps] now. But in order of ease, here are some things to get you started thinking about your teaching in the (sigh) fall.

Syllabus:

Do your students do public, digital projects? Ever thought of thought of having them sign a release? You should, and Jade Davis explains why and shares her model.

Sara Goldrick-Rab shares her syllabus statement on Basic Needs Security and why it’s important to include.

Read the full resource here.

Announcement: More Web Archives, Less Process

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From the announcement:

The Library of Congress Digital Content Management Section is excited to announce the release of 4,240 new web archives across 43 event and thematic collections on loc.gov, our largest single release of web archives to date! Web archives such as Slate Magazine from 2002 to present, Elizabeth Mesa’s Iraq War blog, and Sri Lanka’s current president Maithripala Sirisena’s campaign website (no longer live on the web) are now waiting to be discovered alongside millions of other Library items. Keep watching The Signal for deeper dives into the unique collections with web archives now available on loc.gov. The Web Archiving Team sends its deepest gratitude to all involved in this significant achievement for the Library.

Read the full announcement here.

Announcement: Announcing New ODH Awards (August 2018)

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From the announcement:

The Office of Digital Humanities is pleased to announce 18 awards through our Digital Humanities Advancement Grants and our Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities programs. These projects are part of a larger slate of 218 awards just announced by the NEH. Congratulations to all the award recipients as they begin these exciting new projects!

Read the full announcement here.

Job: Instruction + Research Specialist for the Arts and Humanities, Occidental College

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From the ad:

The CDLA [Center for Digital Liberal Arts] supports textual, visual, and archival modes of inquiry across the arts and humanities through a focus on resource curation, sharing, and analysis.  The Specialist is a two-year limited term position with possibility of renewal. We seek a Specialist who will:

Collaborate directly with arts and humanities faculty to realize student learning goals, participate in related grant and funding opportunities, and inform assessments of student learning.

Research and implement best practices in digital pedagogy and instructional design in the arts and humanities with a focus on visual, music, and other media resources, humanities databases, archival resources, and digital humanities practices…

Read the full ad here.

Editors’ Choice: Post-Custodial Archives and Minority Collections

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Last week (July 31, 2018), I had the honor of speaking at CLIR’s (Council on Library and Information Resources) summer seminar for new Postdoctoral Fellows. I was very excited to get the opportunity to meet a new cohort of fellows just as they are beginning their new positions at various institutions. (For more information on CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowships, visit their website! And keep an eye out for the next round of applications this fall/winter.)

My talk centered on the work we do at Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage (aka “Recovery”), the importance of minority archives, and working toward inclusivity. For 27 years, Recovery has dedicated itself to recovering, preserving, and disseminating the lost written legacy of Latinas and Latinos in the United States. US Latina/o collections, like other minority collections, do not traditionally form part of a larger national historical narrative. Herein lies the importance of minority collections: the stories they tell give us a more nuanced understanding of US history and culture.

Let’s take a step back to think about the structure of archives, the inherent issues, and the questions that we—as archivists, scholars, students, and educators—should ask ourselves when engaging with historical collections. Archives help structure knowledge and history. Michel Foucault argues that history “now organizes the document” [with “document” being the archival] “divides it up, distributes it, orders it, arranges it in levels, establishes series, distinguishes between what is relevant and what is not, discovers elements, defines unities, describes relations” (146). Thus history, or perhaps more aptly, what we understand to be or call history, cannot be distinguished from the production and organization of the archive. Furthermore, national archives help to create an authoritative national narrative. The International Council on Archives, for example, describes archives on their webpage as follows:

Archives constitute the memory of nations and societies, shape their identity, and are a cornerstone of the information society. By proving evidence of human actions and transactions, archives support administration and underlie the rights of individuals, organisations and states. By guaranteeing citizens’ rights of access to official information and to knowledge of their history, archives are fundamental to identity, democracy, accountability and good governance.

Given this defined mission of archives, we can think about what archives do or are meant to do; they define:

  • “the nation,”
  • “history,”
  • what is—and what isn’t—considered “important,”
  • “knowledge.”

Read the full post here.

Job: Developer, Digital Scholarship, Wake Forest University

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From the ad:

The Digital Scholarship Developer builds and implements new web applications and sites for faculty research projects. This position was created in part through an “Engaged Humanities” grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and is critical to the delivery of essential applications and service as part of the Library’s partnerships with faculty to create digitally-enriched scholarship. The Developer keeps abreast of new and developing technologies, tracks ongoing trends in digital scholarship, and communicates recommendations to the Z. Smith Reynolds Library and Wake Forest University communities. This position researches, recommends, tests, and subsequently implements innovative software applications that are well-suited for digital scholarship activities.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Hopkins Retrospective Program Manager, Johns Hopkins

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From the ad:

Hopkins Retrospective is an outreach and research initiative sponsored by the Office of the President at Johns Hopkins University that aims to better understand the history of the University and weave that history into the university experience. The Program Manager’s role is to oversee Hopkins Retrospective, including: coordinating the execution of exhibitions and installations for the initiative; creating, developing, and managing the web and social media presence for the initiative; planning and carrying out oral histories for the initiative’s website; and developing and overseeing JHU history-related projects around the university campuses. The position will report to the University Archivist and have dotted-line reporting to the Office of the President.

Read the full ad here.

Report: Library Values & Privacy in our National Digital Strategies

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About the report:

The UW-Milwaukee Center for Information Policy Research, in partnership with Data & Society, along with the American Library Association’s Office of Intellectual Freedom and the New York Public Library, was awarded a National Leadership Grants for Libraries award from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) for the project “Library Values & Privacy in our National Digital Strategies: Field guides, Convenings, and Conversations.” A series of gatherings were held throughout 2017-2018 that brought together library practitioners, privacy advocates, and technology experts to discuss and debate a national roadmap for a digital privacy strategy for libraries. The culminating event — the Library Values and Privacy Summit — was held in New York City bringing together privacy experts from within and outside libraries and sparked discussions on key privacy-related issues and possible paths forward.

Read the full report here.