Category: Blog

DHNow: 2017 in Review

2017

Digital Humanities Now will be taking a break until January 9, but before we go, we’d like to take the time to wrap up 2017. This November marked nine years of publication for Digital Humanities Now. Through the work of our dedicated staff and our generous community of volunteer editorsDHNow continues to build a new model for scholarly communication based on open scholarship, community participation, and attribution.

Our Numbers

Our statistics from 2017 testify to the continuing dynamism and value of open-access scholarship in the digital humanities. Over the course of the year, we featured an average of two to three Editors’ Choice pieces each week for a total of 104 published pieces. We also published an average of seven news items each week for a total of 311 items.

The DHNow community keeps growing. We had almost 33,000 users and nearly 100,000 pageviews on our site this year, and we now have just over 26,500 followers on Twitter.

Our Editors-at-Large are still the key to DHNow’s success. In 2017, a total of 83 people volunteered their time to serve as Editors-at-Large for at least one week and, on average, four separate weeks. Of our Editors-at-Large, 64 were new volunteers, and 19 were returning editors. Each week, DHNow had an average of seven Editors-at-Large nominating content for publication. We extend our sincerest gratitude for their time and effort.

New Staff and New Roles

Managing such a large publication also depends on the hard work and dedication of the staff at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM). This fall, new Digital History Fellows and a new Graduate Research Assistant began serving rotations as Editor-in-Chief. Bringing their own diverse experiences in digital humanities and digital public history, LaQuanda Walters Cooper, Greta Swain, and Caitlin Hartnett have all contributed fresh perspectives to DHNow. The role of Editor-in-Chief is essential for ensuring that DHNow remains a valuable resource for the field, and we thank all of our Editors-in-Chief for their expertise and enthusiasm.

2017 marked the departure of Managing Editor Amanda Morton, whose commitment and guidance helped expand and improve DHNow over the years that she worked on the publication. Joshua Catalano has stepped into her role, joining our other Managing Editor, Amanda Regan.

In 2017, Laura Crossley joined the DHNow staff as part of her second year of the Digital History Fellowship. Over the summer, she served as full-time Editor-in-Chief. She has also taken on the role of Site Manager, formatting content for publication, conducting correspondence, running DHNow‘s Twitter account, and taking care of other day-to-day administrative tasks.

Join us again in 2018!

On behalf of the DHNow staff, thank you for another great year. We look forward to publishing more digital humanities news and scholarship in January 2018. Don’t forget to join us again in the new year by nominating RSS/Atom feeds with relevant digital humanities content and by volunteering to serve as Editor-at-Large for a week.

DHNow: 2016 in Review

Digital Humanities Now is on hiatus until January 10, and as we close out another successful year, we want to take some time to reflect on 2016. After eight years of publication, Digital Humanities Now remains a community-curated publication that is driven by a group of dedicated staff members and a community of editors who graciously volunteer their time each week.

The most significant change for DHNow took place in February 2016 when we launched a new system for registering, managing, and communicating with our Editors-at-Large. By simply logging into WordPress, users can now register for an account, manage the dates they have volunteered as Editors-at-Large, and sort through and nominate content all from within the WordPress dashboard. This new system not only integrates the work of an Editor-at-Large into the WordPress environment, but it also reduces the amount of tedious user management our staff does on a weekly basis. By streamlining the process we have attempted to make the management of DHNow more sustainable as a core project at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media.

Our Numbers

Our statistics from 2016 demonstrate the continued production and influence of open source scholarship in Digital Humanities. Over the course of 2016, we featured an average of 2-4 Editors’ Choice pieces each week for a total of 149 published pieces. Additionally, we published an average of six to ten news items each week for a total of 285 items.

DHNow continues to have a substantive readership base with an average of 11,200 unique visitors to our site each month and just over 24,000 followers on Twitter.

Our Editors-at-Large, however, remain the core element to DHNow’s success. A total of 110 people volunteered to donate their time to serve as Editors-at-Large for at least one week and, on average, 3 separate weeks across 2016. DHNow had an average of 8 Editors-at-Large each week and we could not be more grateful for their time and effort. The participation of community members on a week to week basis continues to fuel the success of Digital Humanities Now.

New Staff

Managing such a large publication requires a large and dedicated staff at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM). In 2016 we’ve welcomed numerous new staff members who serve as Editors-in-Chief and who have helped us to diversify the content on DHNow and bring fresh perspectives to the publication. Abby Mullen, a Ph.D. Candidate at Northwestern University and the Project Manager for Tropy at RRCHNM, joined the DHNow team. Additionally, Graduate Research Assistants and Digital History Fellows at RRCHNM began working as Editor-in-Chief on a rotating basis during the semester. Alyssa Fahringer, Andrea Ordione, Jannelle Legg, Jessica Dauterive, Justin Broubalow, Jordan Bratt, Laura Crossley, and Sara Collini all bring diverse viewpoints and experiences in digital humanities and digital public history to their role as Editor-in-Chief. The work of an Editor-in-Chief is crucial to the success of Digital Humanities Now and we couldn’t be more grateful for the expertise, creativity, and hard work of all those involved.

Join us again in 2017!

On behalf of the DHNow staff, thank you for an extraordinary 2016. We will be taking a break from publication until January 2017. Don’t forget to join us again in the new year by nominating RSS/Atom feeds with relevant digital humanities content and by volunteering to serve for a week as Editor-at-Large.

Using the Bookmarklet

Are you viewing an interesting digital humanities project, blog post, conference call, or job posting that you would like to nominate to DHNow? If you’ve been an editor-at-large, you can always use the Nominate This bookmarklet tool! (If you haven’t been an editor-at-large, now’s the time. Sign up here.) 

Why Not Email Nominations?

We frequently receive email nominations, but this is not the most effective way to nominate content. In order to ensure that your nomination is seen in a timely manner by the weekly editor-in-chief, we prefer that you nominate content using the Nominate This bookmarklet. This method not only makes the nomination immediately visible to the editor-in-chief, but also retains the metadata associated with each nomination. This metadata allows us to track the metrics of the associated post.  Using the Nominate This bookmarklet is the most convenient way to nominate content.

How the Bookmarklet Works

The Nominate This bookmarklet is an application that runs in your browser. If you find a post that you think would make a good Editors’ Choice or News item for DHNow, you can nominate that item directly from your browser. Once the bookmarklet is installed all you have to do is click on the icon located on your bookmarks toolbar. 

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A popup window will appear where you can view the content of the post, select appropriate categories, enter the  author’s name, and, finally, nominate it for inclusion using the “Nominate” button. The Nominate This bookmarklet is especially helpful for nominating interesting content that does not appear in the “All Content” section of the PressForward plugin. The Nominate This bookmarklet also allows you to nominate the RSS feed associated with a nominated item for inclusion in DHNow’s selection of RSS feeds. 

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Why Nominate an RSS Feed?

Nominating an RSS feed will allow DHNow to automatically aggregate new content from the web. The editors-at-large then select content from this pool of recent postings. You can nominate a feed using the Nominate This bookmarklet (above) or by filling out a form on the DHNow website. The form can be found here. When nominating a post, the bookmarklet provides an option to nominate an associated RSS feed.

How Do I Download the Nominate This Bookmarklet?

In order to use the Nominate This bookmarklet, you need to do two things. First, you must create an editor-at-large account and volunteer to review content for at least one week. Once your account has been confirmed, you will be able to review and nominate content using the PressForward plugin within DHNow. Once you have served as an editor-at-large once, you can use the Nominate This bookmarklet to nominate content anytime you wish.

To add the Nominate This bookmarklet from the dashboard, click on the “Press Forward” tab and select “Tools.”

A screen shot showing the location of the Press Forward and tools tabs.

You can now download the Nominate This bookmarklet by dragging the icon into your browser’s bookmark tool bar. Make sure that your bookmarks bar is visible.  That’s it! Once you have successfully installed the Nominate This bookmarklet, a “Nominate This” icon will appear in your bookmark bar. You are now ready to quickly nominate content!

Troubleshooting Issues

If you are experiencing issues with the Nominate This bookmarklet, please make sure that you are using the latest version of PressForward. After updating the PressForward plugin please make sure to uninstall the bookmarklet (delete the bookmarklet from your bookmark bar) and then reinstall the updated bookmarklet from the tools tab in PressForward.

Volunteer to Become an Editor-at-Large

As the spring semester draws to a close, we’re issuing the call for volunteers to help us choose the pieces that we feature on Digital Humanities Now over the summer. Editors-at-Large see all the work and announcements published each week on the more than 400 websites that Digital Humanities Now follows. Volunteering a few hours in a given week provides access to a snapshot of the field, as well as experience with the PressForward plugin. For graduate students training in digital humanities, this is an opportunity to see what’s happening in DH. For instructors advising or teaching courses in DH, assigning students to be editors-at-large can offer a dynamic way of including current and developing scholarship in course discussions.

Editors-at-Large sign up for weekly rotations to review the pieces produced or shared by the digital humanities community and nominate the most important scholarly work and news items the weekly DHNow Editor-in-Chief will feature on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Weekly rotations run from Saturday through Friday. At the end of your week’s rotation, we will invite you to give us feedback, both on the pieces that you found for the week and on the nominating process itself.

For those interested in volunteering, please visit our Editors-at-Large corner to register for an account or, if you already have an account, login to volunteer for additional dates. Contact us with any questions, and we hope to see at DHNow!

Editors’ Choice: Welcome to DHNow’s New Editor-at-Large Registration Process

DHNow logo

We’re rolling out the new user registration/Editor-at-Large user management plugin (developed by one of our managing editors, Amanda Regan) this week. This post will serve as an introduction to its new features, and a brief instruction manual for both new users and existing Editors-at-Large. We welcome any feedback you might have after you’ve experienced this new process—our goal is to make the registration process easier, and to enable current editors to be more involved in DHNow.

This post will have separate sections for current editors and new editors, so just jump down to whichever section applies to you.

  • If you are a new editor, you will need to use our new registration form to request a user login and to schedule your time as Editor at Large.
  • Existing users will need to log in to their user accounts on digitalhumanitiesnow.org to add or edit volunteer weeks.

Please note that there will no longer be a separate schedule page in the Editors-at-Large corner on DHNow. If you need to check your dates, you can log in at any time to access your user profile and view or edit your schedule. You can also add dates at any point during the semester using the same interface.

New Editors-at-Large

We encourage all new users to read through the Editors’ Corner of DHNow to learn about the role of our Editors-at-Large, and to get an introduction to using the PressForward plugin to nominate content.

  • Once you’ve decided to become an Editor-at-Large, visit the digitalhumantiesnow.org homepage and scroll down below the slider to locate the “Volunteer” button. Click “sign up” to access the registration form.

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  • Your username, first and last name, email address, and password are required fields. You have the option to add your Twitter username, your institutional affiliation, and a brief biography.
  • Your name, institution, and bio will appear on any Editor’s choice piece published during your week. You can opt out by checking “No” in the “Display Profile” field. If you opt out any information you choose to enter will not be displayed publicly.

About

  • Select the weeks you would like to be an Editor-at-Large for the semester. These dates can be edited at any time from your user profile.

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  • Once you have submitted the form, you will receive an acknowledgement email. Our site manager will approve your submission within 2-3 business days. Once approved, you will receive a second email verifying your username and password and giving you access to DHNow.
  • After you have been approved as an editor and have your login information, you can login and edit your user profile at any time. Keep reading to find out what you can do as an Editor-at-Large.

Current Editors-at-Large

If you have an existing WordPress account, we consider you a current Editor-at-Large. You may not notice as many front-end changes to the process, but we hope that these updates will allow you to have more control over your role as Editor-at-Large. The changes to our system will not affect how you use the PressForward plugin to nominate content. If you have any questions about the changes procedures listed below, please let us know.

Logging In

  • If you are an existing user of our WordPress site, you should already have a username and password and be able to access your user profile. If you are not logged in, you can login by visiting digitalhumanitiesnow.org/wp-admin and entering your credentials, or navigate to the homepage and click “Log In” under “Editors-at-Large” below the slider.
  • Once you have logged in, take a moment to locate the following updated components;
    • the “Nominate Content” button should be immediately visible. Clicking this link will take you directly to the “All Content” page of the PressForward plugin.
    • the “Manage Volunteer Dates” button should be visible under “Volunteer” on the homepage. This button will take you to your user profile.

log_in

Managing Your User Profile and Volunteer Dates

  • Once you have logged in, you can now edit your profile and update your volunteer dates from within the WordPress dashboard. The “Manage Volunteer Dates” button will take you to your user profile or you can select “Your Profile” from the WordPress menu.

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  • From within your user profile, you can edit your email address, add a Twitter username, or add an institutional affiliation to keep your information up-to-date. You can also choose to opt-out of displaying your information publicly on Editor’s Choice pieces during the weeks you are signed up as an Editor-at-Large. You can toggle this display at any time by logging in and editing the Display Profile setting.
  • Your user profile also now contains the dates you are scheduled to be an Editor-at-Large. If you would like to add weeks to your schedule, just use the checkboxes next to your chosen dates to do so. If you cannot be an editor for a selected week, just uncheck that week to remove yourself from the schedule.

Screenshot, user schedule

  • We have also removed the schedule page in favor of a personalized user profile. Since there will no longer be a generic schedule page in the Editors’ Corner, you will need to check inside your user profile to see when you have signed up to be an editor. By shifting control over scheduling, editors have more options for choosing dates, and can add and edit this information at will.
  • Be sure to save your selections by clicking the “Update Profile” button before logging out.

We hope that these changes will improve the experience and engagement level of our Editors-at-Large, and encourage you to give us feedback on these new procedures so that we can make this process as open and effective as possible.

Thank you for your patience and for volunteering at DHNow!

The Year in Review at DHNow

DHNow logo

As a warm winter holiday descends on us here at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, we’re once again compelled to take a look back at the year and the accomplishments of Digital Humanities Now. November marked our seventh year of publication and what started as Dan Cohen’s Twitter feed in 2009 has become a community-curated publication that benefits from the efforts of a dedicated staff and a generous community of volunteer editors who continue to improve the publication and build a new model for scholarly communication that values open scholarship, participation and attribution.

In July 2015 we launched a redesigned version of Digital Humanities Now, designed by Amanda Regan, that responded to readers’ requests for a responsive design, improved navigation, and increased transparency of the editorial process. An extension of the PressForward TurnKey Theme, DHNow’s new theme reveals metadata collected by PressForward and offers new ways to make that metadata outwardly visible. In addition to a newly redesigned homepage, the new look contains a number of new features such as an index of previous posts and a list of all the feeds currently aggregated by DHNow.

Moving forward, we’ve outlined a new user management system that will take effect in 2016 and is geared toward reducing the amount of administrative work involved in managing an open source publication, making the contributions of our staff and Editors-at-Large outwardly visible, and maintaining a simple yet effective workflow for our Editors. Building on the technical knowledge accumulated through contributing to the development of PressForward and the PressForward TurnKey Theme, Amanda Regan has helped to design and write a plugin that will accomplish many of these goals by moving the user registration process out of Google Docs and entirely into WordPress. More details about this new process will be released early next year.

Our Numbers

Our statistics for 2015 continue to demonstrate that our efforts at consistency have been effective and the community’s production of valuable, open-access scholarship continues to be dynamic and inspiring. In 2015, we featured 168 items as “Editors’ Choice” on the site, averaging two to four Editors’ Choice items, selected twice each week. Additionally, we circulated approximately ten “news” items per week in 2015, for a total of 383.

Our readership also continues to grow.  In 2015, we garnered an average of just over 12,000 unique visitors to the DHNow site each month, and in July we hit 20,000 Twitter followers. Although our stats have improved from 2014, what continues to sustain DHNow’s success is the community of Editors-at-Large who support DHNow through the donation of their time and energy.

New Staff and New Roles for a Redesigned DHNow

As with many long-standing projects, there have been changes to staffing on DHNow, and the close of the calendar year offers us an opportunity to thank the both past and current staff at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM) for the dedicated effort, creativity, and problem solving that goes on behind the scenes each week to keep the publication running, growing, and improving.

This fall Lisa M. Rhody accepted a position as the Deputy Director of Digital Initiatives at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center. As the Associate Director of Research Division at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM), Lisa was involved with multiple projects. Serving as the Technical Director of PressForward 2 she helped to drive development forward and was instrumental in the maintenance, enhancements, and success of DHNow in her role as Managing Editor. DHNow, and its staff, have benefitted tremendously from her leadership, guidance, and dedication. Under Lisa’s leadership Digital Humanities Now continued to rapidly expand and she was instrumental in outlining and implementing numerous new features.

Joshua Catalano joined our staff in August 2014 as a Graduate Research Assistant and has assumed the role of Site Manager for Digital Humanities Now.  In this role, he is responsible for conducting correspondence, managing Twitter, and formatting the content chosen by the DHNow community.  Joshua also serves as one of the rotating Editors-in-Chief.

While Joshua handles much of the day to day administrative tasks for Digital Humanities Now and ensures content is published each week, Amanda Regan and Amanda Morton have transitioned into the role of Managing Editors, while Stephanie Westcott has transitioned into the position of General Editor. While still involved in the day to day management of the publication, our new Managing Editors will now be working to improve outreach efforts and refine both the editorial and volunteer workflow. Along with Benjamin Schneider, Amanda and Amanda also serve as rotating Editors-in-Chief.

Join us again in 2016!

On behalf of the DHNow staff, thank you for an extraordinary 2015. We will be taking a break from publication until January 2016. Don’t forget to join us again in the new year by nominating RSS/Atom feeds with relevant digital humanities content and by volunteering to serve for a week as Editor-at-Large.

 

Sign Up to Become a DHNow Editor-at-Large

Creative Commons image by vial3tt3 via Flickr

Creative Commons Image by Junya Ogura via FlickrAs we wrap up Fall 2015 and look to the New Year, we’re issuing another call for volunteers to help us choose the pieces that we feature on Digital Humanities Now. Editors-at-Large can see all the work and announcements published each week on the more than 475 websites that Digital Humanities Now follows. Volunteering a few hours in a given week provides access to a snapshot of the field, as well as experience with the PressForward plugin. For graduate students training in digital humanities, this is an opportunity to see what’s happening in DH. For instructors advising or teaching courses in DH, assigning students to be Editors-at-Large can offer a dynamic way of including current and developing scholarship in course discussions.

Editors-at-Large sign up for weekly rotations to review the pieces produced or shared by the digital humanities community and nominate the most important scholarly work and news items the weekly DHNow Editor-in-Chief will feature on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Weekly rotations run from Sunday through Saturday. At the end of your week’s rotation, we will invite you to give us feedback, both on the pieces that you found for the week and on the nominating process itself.

In early 2016 we will be implementing a new user registration and volunteer sign-up process. We aren’t yet ready to ask users to participate in this new process but, in the meantime, you can still sign up for Spring 2016! Users who sign up now can do so using our current google form. Once we launch our new process we’ll migrate your account to the new system and send you instructions on how to edit, view, or add new volunteer dates.

For those interested in volunteering, please visit our Editors-at-Large Corner, and fill out the form to volunteer.

Contact us with any questions, and we hope to see you at DHNow!

Coming Soon: A New DHNow User Registration Process

This is the first of a series of blog posts that will address some important updates to the DHNow editorial process. Next semester we will roll out a new system that will streamline our registration process for editors-at-large and allow existing editors to add volunteer dates, create user bios, and update profile information through the WordPress user interface. This initial post will outline the reasons for this change and briefly describe the new features editors can expect from our new registration process.

Simplification is our end goal. The current procedure for managing the editorial team is a multi-step process that requires the use of google forms, spreadsheets, customized scripts, and WordPress plugins. It can be complicated for new editors-in-chief, and for our existing editors-at-large. We think our new process will simplify registration, give editors-at-large more opportunities to share information and be involved in DHNow, and allow us to move away from our dependency on multiple platforms for user management. The goal of this series of posts is to make our process as transparent as possible, and to introduce current and future editors-at-large to our new user management scheme. Unlike our normal amplification posts, these blog posts will have open comments; we encourage current and future editors—or anyone interested in how DHNow works, to jump into the conversation with questions or comments about the process.

Our current weekly user enrollment system consists of three stages: signup/adding volunteer dates, sending introductory and follow-up emails, and using a WordPress plugin to add users to WP. As those of you who have volunteered in the past know, we use Google forms to sign up new editors, and to allow existing editors to volunteer for additional dates. Using a Google Script attached to the spreadsheet generated from this form, the Editor-in-Chief for the week sends out emails to users the week before and the week after their week as editor. These first two steps make DHNow heavily dependent on the ever-evolving Google Drive and Google Scripts, and require weekly Editors-in-Chief to spend time learning and managing the complex spreadsheet management that we would like to spend on curating and publishing posts for DHNow.

The new approach will streamline these procedures by automating the registration process and allow users to manage their profiles from within WordPress. Rather than moving between several platforms, the new registration process will be built into WordPress. Though these changes will, for the most part, take place on the back end, users can look forward to a new login screen and user-profile screen where volunteer dates can be added or modified. We’ll provide more extensive blog posts with details about how to use these new features later, but for now here are some features that existing and prospective editors can look forward to next semester.

Existing Editors-at-Large will be able to:

  1. Add and edit the dates you’ve volunteered to be an Editor: By integrating our scheduling, weekly emails, and user registration process with WordPress, we’ve made it possible to add or edit dates from within your user profile. You will see weekly checkboxes for the semester on your user page that you can select—or deselect—at will.
  2. Edit your user bio: You will be prompted at sign in to go to your user page on DHNow and add any biographic or geographic information you would like to share with us or our readers.
  3. Be more visible and accessible during the weeks you have registered to be an editor. Our new system will pull in the biographic information you’ve provided on your user page and make it visible on Editors’ Choice posts for the week.

New Editors-at-Large will:

  1. Be prompted to register with the site at first login. A user registration form will ask for any biographic information you would like to provide, allow you to sign up for your first week or weeks as Editor-at-Large, and allow you to create a username and password. This registration information will be sent to an Editor-in-Chief for approval and you’ll receive a confirmation email once your account has been activated.
  2. Be provided with emails confirming and approving newly registered accounts and emails with instructions on how to be an Editor-at-Large, including how to use the PressForward plugin to nominate items and feeds, and how to use the Nominate This bookmarklet to nominate items outside of the plugin.

We want this process to be as open as possible; these changes are designed to make the site more accessible to our editors, so we want to hear from you as we move forward. Future posts dealing with the changes to the Editor-at-Large registration process will be posted to the DHNow blog on Mondays and Wednesdays to prevent any interference with our usual content, and will be open to comments.

Thank you!

A New Look for DHNow!

Home Page on Digital Humanities Now

We are proud to unveil a new Digital Humanities Now theme that responds to readers’ requests for a responsive design, improved navigation, and increased transparency of the editorial process. An extension of the PressForward TurnKey Theme, DHNow’s new theme reveals metadata collected by PressForward and offers new ways to make that metadata outwardly visible. We’ve even added a new blog to help readers stay up to date with the latest improvements to our publication.

Same Content in a Dynamic New Format

DHNow’s new layout continues to display the four most recent Editors’ Choice selections at the top of the page in a slide show and news items below the fold using a responsive design that you can read easily on displays ranging from mobile devices to large screens. In addition, the new theme places important information about our editorial process, how to submit a feed, how to volunteer, and how to be an Editor-at-Large right on the front page.

Improved Navigation

Post Index Page on Digital Humanities NowIn addition to a redesigned homepage, you can now browse all of DHNow’s previous features through our easy-to use indexes. Our Index page is divided into content categories: Editors’ Choice, Jobs, Announcements, Resources, CFPs & Conferences, Funding & Opportunities, and Reports. Each page includes expandable tabs that list all posts in the category by year, making it easier for users to locate items that had previously been buried in our site’s archives pages.

Increased Transparency

Subscribed Feeds Page on Digital Humanities NowThis design introduces a new page called Subscribed Feeds, which lists the titles of all of the feeds currently aggregated by DHNow and replaces our outdated “Compendium.” Content from Subscribed Feeds populates DHNow’s list of items reviewed and nominated by Editors-at-Large to feature on DHNow. Feeds appear alphabetically by the title according to three tabbed categories: Active, Alerted, and Broken.

  • Active feeds are currently read by the plugin.
  • Alerted feeds have been checked for new content but return errors (eg. timeout, loading error, parsing error, etc.).
  • Broken feeds lists feeds that have consistently returned errors rendering content unreadable by DHNow.

Increasing the visibility of our subscribed feeds makes the editorial process more transparent, while at the same time provides a service to those who submit content. Unfortunately, RSS/Atom feeds sometimes break down, resulting in errors that drag down the efficiency of our feed reader. As a result, we periodically clean out our Broken Feeds list. Now, checking our list will allow users to see if there are problems with their site’s feed or if it has been removed. We invite anyone whose feed does not appear and who would like for it to be included to resubmit. We apologize for any inconvenience, and appreciate your patience as we attempt to improve the process.

New Blog

Our new design also features a DHNow blog, which will be updated periodically pointing users to new features, reviewing our editorial process, and showcasing the work of our dedicated group of graduate student Editors-in-Chief.

DHNow’s theme incorporates open source libraries such as Liquid Slider, Dan Wild’s Brew theme, Redux Framework, the Twitter Bootstrap Framework, and FontAwesome.

Many thanks to Amanda Regan for her hard work spearheading the redesign effort, and to the whole DHNow editorial team, including: Stephanie Westcott, Amanda Morton, Jordan Bratt, Aram Zucker-Schraff, and Lisa Rhody.