Our schools and libraries are being radically re-imagined for the digital age, but what about our museums? The New York Public Library, for example, is bravely (and controversially) rethinking its Fifth Avenue flagship building. Last month, MIT and Harvard announced edX, a partnership to offer free online courses, and last fall, Stanford offered three massive…

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Reports from the 29th Annual Symposium, held May 22-23, 2012, are now available in the archive. Sopan, A. (May 2012) Monitoring Scientific Conference: Real-time Visualization and Retrospective Analysis of the Backchannel Conversation HCIL-2012-12 [Link to Report] Dunne, C., Shneiderman, B. (May 2012) Motif Simplification: Improving Network Visualization Readability with Fan and Parallel Glyphs HCIL-2012-11 [Link…

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Editors’ Note: This piece consists of three posts. A PDF of full report available from netpreserve.org. From the first in the three-part series: Imagine a world in which libraries and archives had never existed. No institutions had ever systematically collected or preserved our collective cultural past: every book, letter, or document was created, read and…

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I have written before about some issues relating to RDA and RDF. Today I want to actually consider some things we should consider that should cause us to question the concept of “RDA in RDF.” For many decades we have been using relational databases to store our bibliographic data, bibliographic data that we create and exchange…

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There seems to be a lot of topic modelling going on at the moment. Any why not? Projects like Mining the Dispatch are demonstrating the possibilities. Tools like Mallet are making it easy. And generous DHers like Ted Underwood and Scott Weingart are doing a great job explaining what it is and how it works. I’ve talked briefly about using topic modelling to explore…

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It has been six months since Digital Humanities Now relaunched in version 2.0 through the support of the PressForward Project, funded by the Sloan Foundation. The first version, run between 2009 and 2010, was an automated survey of Twitter. Version 1.5 was a one-man operation by Dan Cohen to vet the material using traditional methods of…

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