Todd Presner (Duke ’94), gave the following presentation at Duke on January 24 entitled “Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities: From Berlin to Los Angeles and Beyond.” Presner, Professor of Germanic Languages and Comparative Literature at UCLA, where he is the Director of UCLA’s Center for Jewish Studies and Chair of the Digital Humanities Program,…

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In last December’s NITLE Digital Scholarship Seminar, Teaching DH 101, I presented my experience designing and proposing a new digital humanities course at St. Norbert College. In that talk, I found myself arguing, somewhat to my surprise, for interdisciplinarity—by which I mean clear association with one of the humanities disciplines that converge under the digital…

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In the very useful survey of the “history web” in their 2005 book Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web , Dan Cohen and Roy Rosenzweig identify the range of genres that encompassed the historical content on the web: archival sites, exhibits and scholarly essays, teaching and learning sites, and discussion forums…

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By Scott Weingart

“The Scientific Revolution” is as apt a name as any for a period which set the world in motion. Something feels fundamentally different on this side of its amorphous borders than what came before, and this difference is felt most keenly in the sciences. This is not a paper about the scientific revolution; it will not reveal the steady stream of precedents before the great publications of Copernicus and Vesalius.

Michael Widner, Learn to Code; Learn Code Culture, February 16, 2012 Along with the explicit philosophical and cultural aspects of coding—e.g., open source, geek culture, hacking, hacktivism, black hat vs. white hat, etc.—code itself is a form of writing with a dual audience: machines and other coders (including one’s future self). Others may want to…

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I chanced across an discussion last night on twitter which aligns with a problem I have been considering – how can the digital humanities include social sciences and science, if at all?  This relates to the question of creating an undergraduate curriculum of some sort in Digital Humanities which would be truly interdisciplinary, that would work for…

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Digital Humanities Now is pleased to announce the Journal of Digital Humanities (ISSN 2165-6673), forthcoming in March 2012. In this comprehensive, peer-reviewed, open access journal we will feature the best scholarship, projects, and tools produced by the digital humanities community in the previous quarter. The Journal of Digital Humanities will offer expanded coverage of the digital humanities in three…

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It strikes me that there are two, somewhat overlapping, reasons that we do visualization. They are a method of communication and a method of discovery. Visualization for Communication Visualizations are methods of communication, ways of communicating something that we already understand. In this case, things like Tuftee’s work on presenting data and information is squarely about communicating known…

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