Category: CFPs & Conferences

CFP: Digital Humanities Congress 2018

From the CFP:

The Digital Humanities Congress is a conference held in Sheffield every two years. Its purpose is to promote the sharing of knowledge, ideas and techniques within the digital humanities.

The Digital Humanities Institute is the new name for HRI Digital, one of the UK’s leading centres for the digital humanities: https://www.dhi.ac.uk

Digital humanities is understood by Sheffield to mean the use of technology within arts, heritage and humanities research as both a method of inquiry and a means of dissemination. As such, proposals related to all disciplines within the arts, humanities and heritage domains are welcome.

Read the full CFP here.

CFP: African American History, Culture & Digital Humanities

From the post:

What happens to digital humanities inquiry when we begin with Black culture, Black thought, and Black persons at the center of our endeavors? How does this shift challenge and expand both the humanities and the digital? What happens to Black and African American humanities research when we lead with the digital? Interdisciplinary inquiry into both the online practices of black users and humanities research focused on black history and culture using digital tools has expanded in the past decade. Too often, this work happens on the margins of established disciplines, boundaries, and paradigms. Rather than arriving at black digital research as an afterthought or a tactic to achieve “diversity”, privileging black theory and black culture in our scholarship can provide alternate paradigms through which to understand the digital and the humanistic.

Read more here.

CFP: Finding Community in Digital Humanities – 2018 Digital Frontiers/IDRH Conference

From the post:

The Call for Proposals for the 2018 Digital Frontiers/IDRH Conference—Finding Community in Digital Humanities conference is now live! Please submit proposals for presentations, panels, workshops, an et. on or before Friday, April 6, 2018. 2018 marks the first year of conference collaboration between Digital Frontiers (University of North Texas) and the Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities (University of Kansas).

Read more here.

CFP: Ethics and Archiving the Web

From the post:

MITH is very excited to announce our participation in the Ethics and Archiving the Web National Forum which will be taking place at the New Museum in New York City, March 22-24. This collaboration between Rhizome and the Documenting the Now project will bring together activists, librarians, journalists, archivists, scholars, developers, and designers who are interested in generative conversations around the ethical use of the web in archives and memory work. If this sounds relevant to you please register today while spots are still available. In addition to the program of panels and talks there will also be a series of workshops on the Saturday following the main event. Continue below the fold for a bit more context on why this event is important to MITH’s work here at UMD.

Read more here.

CFP: Endangered Data Week

From the post:

Led by the Digital Library Federation, Endangered Data Week, February 26th – March 2nd, is an international, collaborative effort, coordinated across campuses, nonprofits, libraries, citizen science initiatives, and cultural heritage institutions, to shed light on public datasets that are in danger of being deleted, repressed, mishandled, or lost. The goals of Endangered Data Week are to promote care for endangered collections by publicizing the availability of datasets; increasing critical engagement with them, including through visualization and analysis; and by encouraging political activism for open data policies and the fostering of data skills through workshops on curation, documentation and discovery, improved access, and preservation.

Read more here.

CFP: MLA 2019 – What Do We Teach When We Teach DH?

From the CFP:

Over the last decade as digital humanities research has flourished, the MLA convention—as well as other venues—has witnessed increasingly vigorous discussions about teaching digital humanities. We now find ourselves in a discipline that is not so new (acknowledging, of course, that DH is as old as the computer itself) and simultaneously at a moment when we need to talk formally about teaching and learning. As such, if the unacknowledged debate that sits at the heart of discussions about digital humanities is always, “What is digital humanities?”, it’s important to acknowledge how that question is always already related to the question of how we teach digital humanities.

Read the full CFP here.

CFParticipation: Digital Humanities Journals Survey

About the survey:

The main goal of this survey is to develop an expert survey based journal ranking for the Digital Humanities field. This ranking would benefit scholars and practioners in this field by providing them with target outlets for their work; by identifying streams of research; by allowing to showcase accomplishments to tenure and promotion committees; by consolidating the communication ecosystem; by helping librarians to make selection decisions and apply available funds.

Read more here.

Announcement: Workshop – Miranda Digital Asset Platform

From the post:

This two-day workshop aims to bring together a variety of participants from early modern studies, digital humanities, and libraries and archives for a behind-the-scenes look at the Folger’s new digital asset platform, Miranda. Participants will get a first-hand tour of Miranda and a chance to explore its future development and potential outcomes. Conversations will be framed in the context of current tools and the trajectory of digital scholarship with a keen eye towards efficacy and practical use. Participants will contribute to small, collaborative working groups and provide guidance to the Folger for current and future development.

Read more here.

CFP: Textual Heritage and Information Technologies – El’Manuscript 2018

From the CFP:

El’Manuscript-2018 is the seventh in a series of biennial international conferences entitled “Textual Heritage and Information Technologies” that brings together linguists, specialists in historical source criticism, IT specialists, and others involved in studying and publishing our textual heritage. Along with the lectures, a summer school will be part of the conference, which will allow practitioners to become familiar with various systems and methods for working with manuscripts and texts.

Read the full CFP here.