SIG-AH and SIG-VIS (Arts & Humanities, Visualization-Images-Sound) of ASIST are joining forces to examine the digital humanities and information visualization with a group of papers to be published in an upcoming special issue of the Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology.

In 2012, NINES (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-century Electronic Scholarship) at the University of Virginia will be hosting the second of two NEH Summer Institutes in Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities. The topic is “Evaluating Digital Scholarship,” and we are specifically inviting current and incoming Department Chairs in English, Foreign Languages, and Classics to participate.

HASTAC’s fifth international conference, hosted this year by the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, December 1-3, practices what it preaches, experimenting with an array of new forms and formats designed not just to discuss “Digital Scholarly Communication” but to explore how each of those three terms–digital, scholarly, communication–changes the others in ways that presage powerful new possibilities for higher education (both in the academy and for the general public).

This edited collection will consist of an editors’ introduction and three sections. The first section will  consist of eight to twelve chapters that define field connections between rhetoric and the digital humanities. The second section will consist of eight to twelve chapters focused on research methodology.