Software Studies: call for papers for the next issue of Computational Culture journal. Call For Papers Computational Culture, a journal of software studies Deadline: 30th March 2012 The new peer-reviewed open access journal Computational Culture has been launched. The first issue entitled ‘A Million Gadget Minds’ is available online at: http://computationalculture.net/ Computational Culture is now…

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Call for Submissions for the AHR Prize for the Best Digital Article.

The American Historical Review invites submissions of online works of digital historical scholarship to be considered for the newly established AHR Prize in Digital Historical Scholarship. The winning submission will be published online by Oxford University Press in April 2014 as a fully peer-reviewed, fully citable work of original scholarship and as an integral part of the AHR. It will, therefore, be included in the table of contents, along with a short abstract, in the April 2014 issue of the AHR. The deadline for submission is March 1, 2013. All entries will be considered by the editor of the AHR and reviewed and refereed by the editorial board of the AHR and by external referees.

Quinn Dombrowski and I are writing a manual on using the Drupal 7 CMS for digital humanities projects.  Titled unimaginatively Drupal for Humanists, it is meant to provide first an understanding of how to install and configure Drupal and then a series of case studies representative of Drupal’s use in humanities research and the library.

“From margin to mainstream: mobile technologies transforming lives and libraries”

24-26 September 2012 at the Open University, UK

Mobile technology has transformed so many aspects of our lives: how we work, how we communicate, how we study and how we play. Since the first successful M-libraries conference in 2007, libraries around the world have made huge advances in harnessing the technology to improve and enhance their services.  The Fourth international conference will bring together researchers, technical developers, managers, educators, and library practitioners to review achievements to date and consider the creative challenges and opportunities ahead.

We warmly welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. Themes could include digital text, linguistics technology, imaging and visualization, linked data, open access, geographic analysis, serious gaming and any other digital or quantitative methods. While we welcome high-quality application papers discussing individual projects, the series also hopes to accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information scientists or digital humanists, and have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

We’re going to be shining a light on the failures that we individually and we collectively have had as project teams, institutions, and maybe even the sector as a whole.

Each Fail will present a short 7-10 minute slot followed by 10 minutes