Short paper abstracts are sought for a panel called “Faulkner and the Digital Humanities” to be proposed to the 39th Annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference, which will take place in Oxford, Mississippi, July 7-11, 2012. The conference title this year is “Fifty Years after Faulkner,” and its broad theme is a re-examination and re-appraisal of Faulkner’s life and work. In addition to traditional approaches, this panel seeks papers that are interdisciplinary in scope, collaborative in nature, and / or use multimedia.

These NEH grants support national or regional (multistate) training programs for scholars and advanced graduate students to broaden and extend their knowledge of digital humanities. Through these programs, NEH seeks to increase the number of humanities scholars using digital technology in their research and to broadly disseminate knowledge about advanced technology tools and methodologies relevant to the humanities.

Humanities computing is undergoing a redefinition of basic principles by a continuous influx of new, vibrant, and diverse communities or practitioners within and well beyond the halls of academe. These practitioners recognize the value computers add to their work, that the computer itself remains an instrument subject to continual innovation, and that competition within many disciplines requires scholars to become and remain current with what computers can do. Topics in the Digital Humanities invites manuscripts that will advance and deepen knowledge and activity in this new and innovative field.

Digital Philology is a new peer-reviewed journal devoted to the study of medieval vernacular texts and cultures. Digital Philology encourages both applied and theoretical research that engages with the digital humanities and shows why and how digital resources require new questions, new approaches, and yield radical results.