Category: News

CFP: Utah Symposium on the Digital Humanities 2019

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From the CFP:

The fourth Utah Symposium on the Digital Humanities continues conversations that have taken place at earlier DHU conferences. It enables scholars in Utah and neighboring regions to dwell further on issues that are of concern to the digital humanities.

DHU4 explores the links and intersections which join humans, machines, and disparate vocational cultures. These links are central to Utah’s own history. In 1861, in Salt Lake City, Western Union linked together the nation with the transcontinental telegraph. In 1869, the “golden spike” joined the two halves of the transcontinental railroad. A century later, in 1969, the University of Utah became the fourth node or intersection of the Arpanet. For the anniversary year of 2019, in conjunction with the second annual Lingofest conference, we aim to expand, deepen, and examine the connections between people who work in, and reflect on, the digital culture that has emerged in concert with these networks.

Read the full CFP here.

Job: Assistant/Associate Professor of History (Digital History), Penn State

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From the ad:

The Pennsylvania State University, Department of History invites applications for a tenured or tenure-track position in digital history with a specialization in any field. The appointment will be made at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor, depending upon qualifications, and will begin in August 2019. The successful applicant should be able to: demonstrate an active research agenda that engages digital humanities methodologies; enhance the graduate and undergraduate curricula; contribute immediately to both graduate and undergraduate teaching in the department; and help to launch and participate in Penn State’s new Digital Humanities minor in the College of the Liberal Arts. The candidate must have a Ph.D. in hand at the time of application. Prospective candidates should submit a curriculum vitae, a letter of application that describes current and future research, evidence of teaching effectiveness, evidence of digital history scholarship, and the names and contact information of three references. Applications may also include up to three offprints or unpublished papers or chapters. Review of applications will begin on December 1, 2018 and continue until the position is filled.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Open Educational Technology Specialist (Two Vacancies), CUNY

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From the ad:

The TLC and GCDI seek two Open Educational Technology Specialists who will work on programming related to CUNY’s institutional investment in Open Educational Resources (OER). Beginning in 2017 and continuing into the upcoming academic year, New York State has made significant investments in supporting the development, deployment, and integration of OER across the curriculum, saving CUNY students more than $8m in the first year of the initiative alone.

CUNY faculty have expressed desire to host OER and to stage student engagement with them on CUNY-built and maintained platforms. Two such platforms are supported at The Graduate Center: the CUNY Academic Commons (CAC) and Manifold Scholarship. The Open Educational Technology Specialists will support faculty and staff from across CUNY who are doing OER-related work on these platforms.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Curator, Digital Publications, British Library

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From the ad:

Joining our Contemporary British Publications team, this role is an exciting opportunity to help the Library develop its ability to collect, manage and make available complex digital publications. The Library’s ‘Emerging Formats’ project is focused on UK publications created for the mobile web, as interactive narratives or in database format. This role will support the project in desk-based research on existing knowledge and capabilities; engaging with creators, libraries and users of complex digital publications; and in documenting the findings of the project.

Read the full ad here.

Job: People Not Property Project Coordinator, UNC Greensboro

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From the ad:

The People Not Property project manager will coordinate digitization and transcription activities involving student workers, volunteers, and registers of deeds in 26 North Carolina counties, providing access to approximately 30,000 pages of slave deeds recorded in the state before 1865. People Not Property is a three-year project of the UNC Greensboro University Libraries, funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission of the National Archives.

Read the full ad here.

Resource: salty – Turn Clean Data into Messy Data

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From the resource:

When teaching students how to clean data, it helps to have data that isn’t too clean already. salty is a new package that offers functions for “salting” clean data with problems often found in datasets in the wild, such as:

pseudo-OCR errors
inconsistent capitalization and spelling
unpredictable punctuation in numeric fields
missing values or empty strings

Read the full resource here.

Report: On the importance of web archiving

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From the report:

So, how can social science scholars and researchers take advantage of web archives?

Our Web Science and Digital Libraries (WS-DL) group at Old Dominion University (ODU) has been studying the challenges related to allowing researchers to create and share their own web archives for the past eight years. Our work is focused more on close reading of archived material than distant reading. For those interested in distant reading of web archives, the Archives Unleashed project, a collaboration between historians, librarians, and computer scientists, is developing excellent tools to enable researchers to perform large-scale analysis of web archives.

Read the full report here.

Announcement: Wikipedia Leads Effort to Create a Digital Archive of 20 Million Artifacts Lost in the Brazilian Museum Fire

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From the announcement:

The staggering loss of a possible 20 million artifacts in the fire that consumed Brazil’s Museu Nacional in Rio boggles the mind—dinosaur fossils, the oldest human remains found in the country, and, as Emily Dreyfuss reports at Wired, “audio recordings and documents of indigenous languages. Many of those languages, already extinct, may now be lost forever.” Former Brazilian environment minister called the destruction of Latin America’s biggest natural history museum “a lobotomy of the Brazilian memory.”…

Sadly, as Dreyfuss points out, like many museums around the world, the Museu Nacional had not begun to back up its collection digitally. But it may not be entirely too late for that, in some small part at least. In an announcement last week, Wikipedia called for a post facto crowdsourced backup in the form of user-submitted photos.

Read the full announcement here.

Job: Web Developer, Modern Language Association

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From the ad:

The Modern Language Association (MLA) is seeking a full-stack PHP developer to extend and maintain several open-source software products. These include the WordPress-based MLA Commons, which includes The MLA Style Center and the MLA Action Network, as well as Humanities Commons and Humanities CORE, which allow humanities scholars to create profiles, seek feedback from peers on their work, establish and join groups to discuss common interests, and collaborate through new kinds of open-access publications. This is an extraordinary opportunity to contribute to an award-winning and active open-source project (see GitHub) and to help shape the strategic direction of the leading membership association in the humanities as we seek to expand the scope of our outreach and develop new ways to serve humanities scholars.

Read the full ad here.

Announcement: ReSounding the Archives has launched!

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From the announcement:

This interdisciplinary project bridges digital humanities, history, and music by bringing historic sheet music back to life through digitization of sheet music, performance of each piece, and student research about each piece. The website makes all of these resources freely available for use by students, teachers, researchers, and public audiences under a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC 4.0).

Read the full announcement here.