What are the access requirements for digital cultural heritage collections? This was one of the questions that the National Digital Stewardship Alliance started exploring earlier this year. Different access requirements result in very different kinds of preservation storage systems, and the NDSA Infrastructure working group wanted to know more about the kinds of requirements that are in place for its members’ collections.

The University of Michigan Press Series in Digital Humanities and HASTAC (the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory) are pleased to announce the UM Press/HASTAC Publication Prize in Digital Humanities. The prize, which is funded by the University’s Institute for the Humanities, will be awarded to two innovative and important projects that display critical and rigorous engagement in the field of Digital Humanities.

How does an invisible system shape the experience of an end user?

I found myself pondering this question again and again throughout the 2011 Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science, which took place November 20-21. This event is jointly sponsored each year by Northwestern University, Loyola University, University of Chicago, and the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Please note that the course is now open to PhD students from any COST country (essentially Europe and Israel), and includes bursaries for travel and accommodation.

The Institute of English Studies (London) is pleased to announce the fourth year of ‘Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age’, an intensive course for PhD students jointly funded by COST and the AHRC, and run in collaboration with King’s College London, the Warburg Institute, and the University of Cambridge.