Category: Reports

Report: Faculty Attitudes toward Open Access and Scholarly Communications

From the report:

Access to scholarship in the health sciences has greatly increased in the last decade. The adoption of the 2008 U.S. National Institutes of Health Public Access Policy and the launch of successful open access journals in health sciences have done much to move the exchange of scholarship beyond the subscription-only model. One might assume, therefore, that scholars publishing in the health sciences would be more supportive of these changes. However, the results of this survey of attitudes on a campus with a large medical faculty show that health science respondents were uncertain of the value of recent changes in the scholarly communication system.

Read the full report here.

Report: Recap of Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities Symposium

From the report:

RMDH featured an all-star cast of Digital Humanities speakers, including opening and closing keynotes by Dr. Jessica Marie Johnson and Dr. P. Gabrielle Foreman respectively, remarks from Dr. Marcia Chatelain, and an artist talk with Pamela Z. Each of these amazing women left participants with remarkable insights. Professor Johnson incorporated music, videos, literature and mapping to take us to Puerto Rico and New Orleans, to make us consider digital Blackness and Black codes, and what would happen if we refuse Blackness as null. If Johnson’s talk asked us to organize with our digital work, Professor Foreman showed us how. Through a history of the Colored Conventions and Langston Hughes’ poetry, Foreman showcased the digital archiving and organizing work her team at Colored Conventions Project are doing. Pamela Z’s outstanding electronic and contemporary classic performance was only enhanced by her discussion of how our best work comes from mistakes and imperfection—so don’t be afraid of them. Similarly, Chatelain reminded us that failure happens in the academy, and when it does we must move onto the next thing. Her talk on the #FergusonSyllabus showcases how #syllabi are a way for academics to teach and lead the public, as well as show that academics are invested in our society and that we have tools which can be helpful.

Read the full report here.

Report: The State of Open Data Report 2017

From the report:

Figshare’s annual report, The State of Open Data 2017, looks at global attitudes towards open data. It includes survey results of 2,300 respondents and a collection of articles from industry experts, as well as a foreword from Jean-Claude Burgelman, Head of Unit Open Data Policies and Science Cloud at the European Commission.

Read more here.

Report: The 2017 Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing

From the report:

I’m filing this conference report from the annual Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, which just wrapped in Orlando, Florida. The conference is a project of Anita B.org, which has been a community for women in computing since 1987. According to the GHC conference website, it’s the largest gathering of women in computing in the world; this year, it sold out within hours, and they estimate over 18,000 attendees were on site. As the name suggests, it skews towards computing (and women), so it’s a great fit for HASTAC folks who identify as women and are interested in a few days of being steeped in academic and industry tech.

Read the full report here.

Report: A Splendid Torch – Learning and Teaching in Today’s Academic Libraries

The Council on Library and Information Resources has published a report on Learning and Teaching in Today’s Academic Libraries.

From the report:

Six essays, written collaboratively by current and former CLIR postdoctoral fellows, explore the contributions that today’s academic libraries—as providers of resources, professional support, and space—are making to learning and teaching. Topics include the continuing evolution of the learning commons, information literacy instruction, digital humanities teaching in libraries, spatial literacy, collaboration in digital special collections, and 3-D printing and pedagogy.

Access the full report here.

Report: British Library Research Data Strategy

About the report:

Our vision for the British Library is that research data are as integrated into our collections, research and services as text is today. The British Library’s users will be able to consume research data online through tools that enable it to be analysed, visualised and understood by non-specialists. Research data will be integrated into our collections and shared storage hubs and we will deliver data from trusted external hosts. All will be easy to discover and linked to related research outputs, be they text, data or multimedia.

The new Research Data Strategy outlines the areas in which the Library’s strengths could be applied to develop appropriate data activities and services to support this vision as well as the Living Knowledge ambition to be the most open, creative and innovative institution of its kind by the time of our 50th anniversary in 2023.

Read more here.

Report: Latest Success Story! Medieval Handwriting and Handwritten Text Recognition

From “Latest Success Story! Medieval Handwriting and Handwritten Text Recognition”:

Two partners in the READ project network have now successfully trained a new model to recognise Gothic handwriting!  The State Archives of Zurich (READ project partner) and the University of Zurich (READ project Memorandum of Understanding partner) have collaborated on the automatic recognition of a collection of medieval charters.

In 1336 a cartulary was written in Königsfelden, close to the city of Brugg (which is now part of Switzerland).  Königsfelden abbey was a well-endowed institution with close ties to the dukes of Habsburg.  In a neat and regular handwriting, the charters of the institution were copied on roughly 260 parchment pages. The cartulary is available online via e-codices.

At the University of Zurich, there is an ongoing project to create a digital scholarly edition of the charters of Königsfelden abbey.  The cartulary is an important source for early writing practices and has already been partially transcribed. The project team have been using our Transkribus platform to produce their transcriptions and they used these transcripts to train and test a Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) model.

Read the full post here.

Report: R is for Archaeology

From the report:

The Society of American Archaeology (SAA) is one of the largest professional organisations for archaeologists in the world, and just concluded its annual meeting in Vancouver, BC at the end of March. The R language has been a part of this meeting for more than a decade, with occasional citations of R Core in the posters, and more recently, the distinctive ggplot2 graphics appearing infrequently on posters and slides. However, among the few archaeologists that have heard of R, it has a reputation for being difficult to learn and use, idiosyncratic, and only suitable for highly specialized analyses. Generally, archaeology students are raised on Excel and SPSS. This year, a few of us thought it was time to administer some first aid to R’s reputation among archaeologists and generally broaden awareness of this wonderful tool. We developed a plan for this year’s SAA meeting to show our colleagues that R is not too hard to learn, it is useful for almost anything that involves numbers, and it has lots of fun and cool people that use it to get their research done quicker and easier.

Read more here.

Report: Using Omeka to Design Digital Art History Projects

From the post:

Last week at the College Art Association 2017 conference,  I chaired and presented at an Omeka-centered panel,  “Using Omeka to Design Digital Art History Projects.” The panel demonstrated how art historians, visual resource librarians, and material culturalists are designing digital art history projects with Omeka to teach threshold concepts in the field.

Read full post here.

Report: Across the Great Divide

From “Across the Great Divide: Findings and Possibilities for Action from the 2016 Summit Meeting of Academic Libraries and University Presses with Administrative Relationships”:

Partnerships and collaborations have become standard responses to the multiple challenges that both higher education and scholarly publishing face. Organizing the work of the academy, either on one campus or across institutions, around collaborative partnerships often enables cost reduction, increases efficiencies, and perhaps most usefully, builds connections between distinct domains to achieve greater strategic impact. In the area of scholarly communication, new or revived partnerships between the university press and the academic research library are an opportunity to re-imagine functions that have been separated from one another through custom, convenience, professional practices, or standard administrative operation.

Read full report here.