Category: Resources

Resource: Visualizing Social Networks -Palladio and the Encyclopédistes

From the post:

There are numerous digital tools for studying networks that can be of use to humanists. One such tool is Palladio, a digital humanities package developed in the Humanities + Design Lab at Stanford University.[1] Palladio lends itself to qualitative studies because the visualizations that it produces (maps, network diagrams, and tables) are familiar to most humanists, and because it allows for the filtering of data through categories chosen by the user. Digital tools offer an opportunity to pursue such research with lower technical barriers to intervention—including easier communication, tools for sharing data, and collaborating on writing. Visualization tools like Palladio allow academics to produce their own diagrams without necessarily hiring a designer.In a pair of posts I will walk through some examples of diagrams produced in Palladio.

Read more here.

Resource: Getting Started with Data Visualization in R Using ggplot2

From the post:

Creating a customized graph that communicates your ideas effectively can be challenging. This tutorial will introduce you to the popular R package ggplot2, its underlying grammar of graphics, and show you how to create stylish and simple graphs quickly. We will also go over some basic principles of data visualization.

Read more here.

Resource: The Newberry Opens Collection of 30,000 French Revolution Pamphlets to Digital Scholarship

From the post:

Over the past year and a half, the Newberry has digitized more than 30,000 French Revolution pamphlets representing contemporary commentators’ views on citizenship, royal execution, and the separation of church and state. Quickly printed and distributed in response to the latest political upheavals, the pamphlets offer a window into how the French people confronted the Revolution and its legacy.

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Resource: Social activism in the United States – Digital Collection & Primary Sources

From the post:

This article outlines some of the high-quality digital collections and primary source materials available online on the history of activism in the United States. This list is not exhaustive, but focuses on strong multimedia collections that can have applications as both resources for original research and use as educational materials for classroom instruction and discussion.

Read more here.

Resource: Bringing Medieval Texts to a Contemporary Audience

About the resource:

The Middle Ages produced a staggering wealth of literary works, spanning dozens of languages and nearly 1,000 years. The question today is how to bring these texts to a modern audience who may not have specialized knowledge of medieval languages and contexts.

The Global Medieval Sourcebook (GMS) answers that question. Curated by Stanford faculty and students, the GMS is an online, interactive collection of medieval texts and their translations. It primarily features shorter texts – never before translated into English – and offers non-experts a gateway into the literature of the Middle Ages.

Read more here.

Resource: Four Maps Uncovering Aboriginal History and Culture

From the resource:

The use of spatial applications in this context is unsurprising when you consider that location is inherently a strong part of Australia’s First Nations culture. Songlines have been used for thousands of years in Australia to help understand and navigate across the land. In combining song, cosmology and nature, songlines form an easily transferable form of map while also deepening connection to land. Some songlines are defined only within local area, while some extend across entire states… These four new interactive spatial innovations showcase some of these rich traditions, and allows users to engage with Australian land on a deeper level, or perhaps to reflect on moments in history when First Australian lives were lost too soon.

Read the full resource here.

Resource: Catalog of Visualization Types to Find the One that Fits Your Dataset

About the resource:

There are a lot of visualization methods to choose from, and it can be daunting finding the right visual for your data, especially for those just starting out. The Data Viz Project by ferdio is a work-in-progress catalog that aims to make the picking process a bit easier. Start with a bunch of chart types and filter by things like shape, purpose, and data format. If you’re stuck, this should help get the juices going.

Read more here.

Resource: Infrastructure for Collaboration – Catching Dead Links And Errors

From the resource:

The The Programming Historian has enjoyed a huge surge of new lessons and translations this past year. This work wouldn’t be possible without our ever-growing community of authors, reviewers, and editors. But as teams get bigger, one needs to take special care to organize around that size.

This post will highlight three behind-the-scenes, technical changes to the way that the Programming Historian is transformed from plain text files into beautiful, preservable HTML pages.

Read the full resource here.

Resource: Exploring Histograms

From the resource:

Histograms are a way to summarize a numeric variable. They use counts to aggregate similar values together and show you the overall distribution. However, they can be sensitive to parameter choices! We’re going to take you step by step through the considerations with lots of data visualizations.

Read the full resource here.