In this digital roundtable, panelists will present undergraduate work that has been created in response to assignments designed to foster the building/interpretation feedback loop of the digital humanities in undergraduates. The projects featured present a full range of technical complexity: from low-barrier-to-entry platforms like woices (dropping audio files on a Google map) to multimodal, geospatial timelines of key years in American literary history, to a map of early modern London that students annotate encyclopedically, street-by-street…

IMAmuseum/ChicagoCodeX – GitHub.

ChicagoCodeX (CCX) provides an authoring and publishing environment for online catalogues with full scholarly apparatus; intuitive book-like navigation; robust presentation tools for complex, multilayered images; and personalized reader annotation tools….

The authors are pleased to provide this program to you under the terms of the GNU General Public License. However, the authors request the use of the phrase, “Powered by ChicagoCodeX (CCX)” in your publications as part of the equivalent to a colophon or copyright page

Save Scholarly Ideas, Not the Publishing Industry (a rant) « Social Media Collective.

… But what I want to know is this:

  • What are *you* doing to resist the corporate stranglehold over scholarly knowledge in order to make your knowledge broadly accessible?
  • What are the five things that you think that other scholars should do to help challenge the status quo?

Please, I beg you, regardless of whether or not we can save a dying industry, let’s collectively figure out how to save the value that prompted its creation: making scholarly knowledge widely accessible

The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010, signed by President Obama earlier this year, calls upon OSTP to coordinate with agencies to develop policies that assure widespread public access to and long-term stewardship of the results of federally funded unclassified research. Towards that goal, OSTP last week released two Requests for Information (RFI) soliciting public input on long term preservation of and public access to the results of federally funded research, including digital data and peer-reviewed scholarly publications.

OSTP previously conducted a public consultation about policy options for expanding public access to federally funded peer-reviewed