Category: Resources

Resource: Zines vs. Google Vision API

From the post:

Everyone likes zines. If you went to library school your probably really love zines. Even if you didn’t go to library school, you still probably like zines. Even Kanye likes zines. However much I like them I don’t really have too much experience with them. While I worked at NYPL I knew about the library zine collection. Other institutions around NYC house large important zine collections as well. But while reading about a large accession to University of Kansas Libraries zine collection from Solidarity! Revolutionary Center and Radical Library I saw they had a number of them already up on Internet Archive.

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Resource: Data Privacy Project

From the post:

The goal of our trainings is to learn the building blocks of privacy protection and digital security. Our teachings focus on activities patrons do every day at the library so that library staff can develop the capacity to:

By beginning with common patron experiences, the Data Privacy Project makes learning about privacy protections relevant to the everyday realities of libraries today.

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Resource: Georgia State Digital Scholarship Job Talk

From the post:

In November 2016, I started as the Digital Scholarship Librarian at Georgia State University Library. During my interview for the position, I presented a job talk related to the topic of opportunities and challenges involved in digital scholarship.

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Resource: Runaway Slave Advertisement Databases

From the post:

Below is a list of existing datasets, as well as those still in development, that are suitable for research and teaching on black resistance. These sources can be used to ask other questions related to social and human capital, and the ways in which enslaved people made use of their immediate resources to facilitate their escape. For example, who were most ‘successful’ at remaining free for longer periods of time, women or men? And why? What role did literacy play in contributing to finding freedom? How important was it for a runaway to have a social network of actors in place to help coordinate the escape? These are questions researchers and students may be interested in pursusing through qualitative and quantitative analysis. The ads, as well as historical fictions of runaways, help broaden public understanding of slavery by highlighting new faces, names, locations, and ways of embodying the spirit of freedom and liberation that pushed the modern era toward democracy.

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Resource: Introducing the Bibliography on Stylometry

From the post:

The understanding of the term stylometry underlying the conceptual scope of the bibliography is relatively wide and covers any type of quantitative analysis of literary style. In practice, a large part of the entries are focused on stylometry understood as the theory and practice of authorship attribution with so-called non-traditional, quantitative methods. However, the bibliography endorses the idea of “stylometry beyond authorship” which means that any computational, preferably but not necessarily quantitative approaches to issues like author gender, literary genre or text type, time period or data of publication are also within the scope of the bibliography. Additionally, the bibliography also contains some forays into aspects not limited to literary texts, such as forensic linguistics or cognitive stylistics. Publications on statistics, machine learning, natural language processing or mainstream stylistics, literary theory and history are included only if they have a direct connection with an issue in stylometry as defined above.

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Resource: Quandl and Forecasting

From the post:

Welcome to another installment of Reproducible Finance with R. Today we are going to shift focus in recognition of the fact that there’s more to Finance than stock prices, and there%u2019s more to data download than quantmod/getSymbols. In this post, we will explore commodity prices using data from Quandl, a repository for both free and paid data sources. We will also get into the forecasting game a bit and think about how best to use dygraphs when visualizing predicted time series as an extension of historical data. We are not going to do anything too complex, but we will expand our toolkit by getting familiar with Quandl, commodity prices, the forecast() function, and some advanced dygraph work.

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Resource: Get Backward on Technology

From the post:

These days there’s always some new technology, something new and shiny, to bring into the classroom. But “new” and “shiny” are not, in themselves, good reasons to adopt a new technology in your classroom; nor are they good reasons to reject it. Whether we’re talking about a virtual reality headset, a collaborative online game, the ability to bring an outside expert to class through web conferencing, the latest course management system, or any of the countless other advances to consider, we need a good pedagogical reason to take it on.

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Resource: Teaching Yourself to Code in DH

From the post:

In “Teaching Yourself to Code in DH,” Scott Weingart (Carnegie Mellon University) has compiled an annotated list of “book-length introductions to analytic programming in DH.” Weingart invited participation via Twitter and a Google spreadsheet as part of a larger project collecting humanities research methodologies. He then culled the most relevant from these to form an annotated list that includes subsections for Historical Analysis; Literary & Linguistic Analysis; General Digital Humanities; Statistical Methods & Machine Learning; and Data Visualization, Web Development & Related.

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