Editors' Choice: Digital History & Argument White Paper


By: Stephen Robertson, Lincoln Mullen, et al.

This white paper is the product of the Arguing with Digital History Workshop organized by Stephen Robertson and Lincoln Mullen of George Mason University, with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The two-day workshop, which involved twenty-four invited participants at different stages in their careers, working in a variety of fields with a range…

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A list of the names of workshop participants

Editors' Choice: Walter Forsberg Digital Dialogue - Yes, We Scan


By: Walter Forsberg

As part of the Digital Dialogues series at Maryland Institute for Technology and the Humanities (MITH), Walter Forsberg, Media Archivist for the National Museum of African American History and Culture at the Smithsonian, presented "an overview of the new museum’s audiovisual digitization programs and activities, in place since 2014." Forsberg "discuss[ed] how NMAAHC established digital file-management workflows,…

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Editors' Choice: Write Out Loud - Risk & Reward in Digital Publishing


By: Danica Savonick

Language is a source of power that makes things happen in the world, and that is an important and challenging lesson to teach in college writing courses. Once students recognize the profound implications of our work with language, many of the skills instructors value — argumentation, organization, revision, editing, proofreading — become much easier to teach.…

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A picture of student work.

Editors' Choice: Critical Digital Praxis in Wikipedia - The Art+Feminism Edit-a-thon


By: Matt Vetter, Theresa McDevitt, Dan Weinstein, and Ken Sherwood

Wikipedia’s gender gap, which results in problems of representation attributed to the lack of women and non-male editors participating in the encylopedia’s production, is by now well-known and well-documented. A groundbreaking survey conducted in 2011, conducted by the Wikimedia Foundation, found that less than 10% of Wikipedia editors identify as women, and less than 1%…

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Digital Humanities Now aggregates and selects material from our list of subscribed feeds, drawing from hundreds of venues where high-quality digital humanities scholarship is likely to appear, including the personal websites of scholars, institutional sites, blogs, and other feeds. We also seek to discover new material by monitoring Twitter and other social media for stories discussed by the community, and by continuously scanning the broader web through generalized and specialized search engines. Scholarship—in whatever form—that drives the field of digital humanities field forward is highlighted in the Editors’ Choice column. In addition to these Editors' Choice pieces, Digital Humanities Now also aggregates news items of interest to the field, such as jobs, calls for papers, conference and funding announcements, reports, and recently-released resources. You can find a complete archive of every News and Editors' Choice item ever published by DHNow in our index.

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DHNow is on spring break!

We will be taking a week off for spring break. All posts that are nominated this week will be included for consideration next week. Keep your nominations coming!