The event’s tagline, “Learn Share Advance”, encourages us to consider how  “open access to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted.”

Although the MARC-based infrastructure is extensive, and MARC has been adapted to changing technologies, a major effort to create a comparable exchange vehicle that is grounded in the current and expected future shape of data interchange is needed.

The Recommendation asks Member States to step up their efforts, pool their resources and involve private actors in digitising cultural material and making it available through Europeana.

In particular, the Recommendation invites Member States to put in place solid plans for their investments in digitisation, make available through Europeana 30 million objects by 2015, get more in-copyright material online, and reinforce their strategies and adapt their legislation to ensure long-term preservation of digital material.

In June 2011, Stanford University hosted a group of librarians and technologists to examine issues and challenges surrounding the use of linked data for library applications. This report summarizes the activities and discussions that took place during the workshop, describes what came out of the workshop, outlines next steps identified by the participants, and provides contextual and background information, including preliminary reports and biographies of workshop participants. The workshop report was produced and edited by the participants and staff at Stanford University Libraries.

Is there a way I can visualize the overlapping networks of people within a culture?” There is! To demonstrate, I’ll use the last dozen films of one of my favorite filmmakers, Alfred Hitchcock. This is a fun way to get started making network visualizations.