Category: Reports

Report: Innovating Pedagogy 2012

The series of reports explores new forms of teaching, learning and assessment for an interactive world, to guide teachers and policy makers in productive innovation.

The first report proposes ten innovations that are already in currency but have not yet had a profound influence on education:

Report: ‘Go digital’ at Museums Association 2012 Conference

Some people who couldn’t make the Museums Association conference (or #museums2012) asked for more information on the session on digital strategies, so here are my introductory remarks and some scribbled highlights of the speakers’ papers and discussion with the audience. 

Report: Blog Archive Good Practices For University Open-Access Policies

This is a guide to good practices for university open-access (OA) policies. It’s based on the type of policy adopted at Harvard, Stanford, MIT, U of Kansas, U of Oregon, Trinity, Oberlin, Rollins, Wake Forest, Duke, U of Puerto Rico, Hawaii-Manoa, Columbia, Strathmore U, Emory, Princeton, Jomo Kenyatta, Utah State, Bifrõst, Miami, California-San Francisco, and the U Massachusetts Medical School (listing some but not all, and in chronological order). However, it includes recommendations that should be useful to institutions with other sorts of OA policy as well.

The guide is designed to evolve. No early version will cover every point on which good practices would be desirable or might be discernible. We plan to revise and enlarge it over time, building on our own experience and the experience of colleagues elsewhere. We welcome suggestions.

Report: Intellectual Property Rights for Digital Preservation

While a number of legal issues colour contemporary approaches to, and practices of, digital preservation, it is arguable that intellectual property law, represented principally by copyright and its related rights, has been by far the most dominant, and often intractable, influence. It is thus essential for those engaging in digital preservation to understand the letter of the law as it applies to digital preservation, but equally important to be able to identify and implement practical and pragmatic strategies for handling legal risks relating to intellectual property rights in the pursuit of preservation objectives. . . .

This report is aimed primarily at depositors, archivists and researchers/re-users of digital works, but will provide a concise introduction to the subject matter for policymakers and the general public.

Report: HathiTrust Wins

The Laboratorium : HathiTrust Wins.

Judge Baer issued his decision in the HathiTrust case, and it’s a near-complete victory for HathiTrust and its print-disabled codefendants. The opinion doesn’t even make it seem like a close case. On every substantive copyright issue, HathiTrust won:

  • Section 108 on library privileges doesn’t limit the scope of fair use.
  • A search index and access for the print-disabled are both fair uses.
  • Search indexing is a transformative use.
  • The libraries aren’t making commercial uses, even though they partnered with Google to get the scans.
  • The plaintiffs haven’t proven that HahiTrust is creating any security risks.
  • There is no market for scanning and print-disabled access, nor is one likely to develop.
  • UM is required under the ADA to provide equal access to the print-disabled, and is allowed to under Section 121 of the Copyright Act.

Report: Digital Curation and the Cloud: Final Report

JISC has released Digital Curation and the Cloud: Final Report. This is a revised version of the draft report that was released earlier this year.

Here’s an excerpt:

Digital curation involves a wide range of activities, many of which may be suitable for deployment within a cloud environment. These range from infrequent, resource-intensive tasks which will benefit from the ability to rapidly provision resources, to day-to-day collaborative activities which can be facilitated by networked cloud services. Associated benefits are offset by risks such as loss of data or service level, legal and governance incompatibilities and transfer bottlenecks. There is considerable variability across both risks and benefits according to the service and deployment models being adopted and the context in which activities are performed. Some risks, such as legal liabilities, are mitigated by the use of alternatives, for example, private cloud models, but this is typically at the expense of benefits such as resource elasticity and economies of scale.

Report: Spatial Techniques for the Digital Humanities: Workshop Recap!

On Monday and Tuesday, August 13-14, the Smith Spatial Analysis Lab teamed up with Amherst College to host a workshop for Five College faculty entitled Spatial Techniques for the Digital Humanities. We had a great two days of discussion, learning, and collaboration, as workshop participants and instructors alike worked through eight themed sessions focusing on a variety of resources and methodologies in the spatial humanities. The event was attended by 22 faculty members with research interests ranging from ancient architecture to Chinese literature to new media. Additionally, Lex Berman from the Harvard Center for Geographic Analysis joined us to share his thoughts on the history and future directions of spatial thinking in the Digital Humanities, as well as his own research experience with the China Historical GIS project, as the keynote speaker for the event.

Report: Spatial Techniques for the Digital Humanities: Workshop Recap!

Spatial Techniques for the Digital Humanities: Workshop Recap!.

On Monday and Tuesday, August 13-14, the Smith Spatial Analysis Lab teamed up with Amherst College to host a workshop for Five College faculty entitled Spatial Techniques for the Digital Humanities. We had a great two days of discussion, learning, and collaboration, as workshop participants and instructors alike worked through eight themed sessions focusing on a variety of resources and methodologies in the spatial humanities. The event was attended by 22 faculty members with research interests ranging from ancient architecture to Chinese literature to new media. Additionally, Lex Berman from the Harvard Center for Geographic Analysis joined us to share his thoughts on the history and future directions of spatial thinking in the Digital Humanities, as well as his own research experience with the China Historical GIS project, as the keynote speaker for the event.

Report: Edward Tufte’s One Day Course: A Review

Last Monday, I got to attend Edward Tufte’s one-day course. I was looking forward to a day of interesting examples, ideas, and discussions, but was disappointed by the amount of rambling and largely historical examples, with little connection to real, current visualization (or presentation) work.

The Setting

The course took place in the large ballroom of the Westin Seattle, which was set up for around 500–600 people. Maybe it was naive to assume a more intimate setting, but I had imagined around 100 people there. There was, consequently, no interaction with the audience of any sort, other than people lining up to get their books autographed before the course started or during lunch break.

As part of the course, you get his four books in a little cardboard box with a handle. With the box, you are handed a sheet of paper with a reading assignment: one or two chapters from each book in the first hour. Unfortunately, he does not actually make use of that reading in his presentation, presumably because he knows that only a fraction of attendees actually read everything they’re supposed to before he gets started.

Report: Digital Research Resources Workshop

OeRC and the Department of Digital Humanities at King’s College London jointly held an invited workshop on 25 July 2012 on Digital Research Resources in the Arts and Humanities. The workshop was organized by David Robey and Andrew Prescott and took place at King’s. It was supported by the AHRC and JISC.

This event reviewed and celebrated the achievements of the AHRC and the JISC in funding the creation of digital research resources for the arts and humanities. It identified future areas for collaboration, dialogue and joint activity as both the AHRC and the JISC restructure their programmes and identify new priorities.

Participants included senior officers from AHRC and JISC together with members of their advisory panels; UK digital arts and humanities specialists; digital research resource project leaders; and representatives of the Museums, Libraries and Archives sector. David De Roure and David Robey were among the speakers.

The full programme and attendance list is available, with links to the speakers’ presentations.