When discussing orphan works, two basic definitional questions arise: (1) exactly what is the “orphan works” problem?, and (2) what is the size of this problem? The answers to these two questions are central to understanding how proposed solutions work to remedy the situation. Though both questions have long been posed, the answer to the first (what is the “orphan works”; problem) can vary based on the type of work or the particular user, and the answer to the second (what is the size of the problem) remains difficult to state with precision. This paper explores both and identifies areas where further research is needed.

This study considers the effect of large-scale deposit on scholarly research publication and dissemination (sharing of research outputs), beginning with the analysis of publishers and institutions managing repositories and their sustainability. The study associates costs with specific activities, performed by key actors involved in research registration, certification, dissemination and digital management: authors, the scholarly community, editors, publishers, libraries, readers and funding agencies. Contrary to most of the existing literature, the study analyses cost structures of individual organizations. The focus of this study is therefore to provide context for the costs to specific organizations and to their choices in terms of scale and scope.

General conversation about the cloud focuses on third-party cloud storage providers. As the results below suggest, adoption of these cloud storage providers remains relatively small. However, when we consider cloud storage alongside several related ways of distributing and using storage as a service, some interesting trends emerge. The results illuminate both the widespread acceptance of some digital preservation storage practices and the continuing uncertainty regarding others.

An updated the sample output from Collatex shows output from user-specified witnesses in the form of (1) an alignment table based on user-specified order, (2) an extracted text of a base text (taking the first specified witness is the base text), (3) generating an apparatus.

There were many insights to be had at HASTAC 2011, but I most enjoyed participating in a panel of lightning talks that all explored issues involved in the creation of a digital repository. At Session D3, the presentations raised many promising possibilities and challenging questions about the nature of the digital archive.