In conjunction with the University of Michigan’s hosting of the 2011 international HASTAC V conference on Digital Scholarly Communication and recentlaunch of the University of Michigan Press Series in Digital Humanities, the Press and HASTAC (the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory) are pleased to announce the UM Press/HASTAC Publication Prize in Digital Humanities. The prize, which is funded by the University’s Institute for the Humanities, will be awarded to two innovative and important projects that display critical and rigorous engagement in the field of Digital Humanities.

The University of Michigan Press Series in Digital Humanities and HASTAC (the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory) are pleased to announce the UM Press/HASTAC Publication Prize in Digital Humanities. The prize, which is funded by the University’s Institute for the Humanities, will be awarded to two innovative and important projects that display critical and rigorous engagement in the field of Digital Humanities.

Please note that the course is now open to PhD students from any COST country (essentially Europe and Israel), and includes bursaries for travel and accommodation.

The Institute of English Studies (London) is pleased to announce the fourth year of ‘Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age’, an intensive course for PhD students jointly funded by COST and the AHRC, and run in collaboration with King’s College London, the Warburg Institute, and the University of Cambridge.

These NEH grants support national or regional (multistate) training programs for scholars and advanced graduate students to broaden and extend their knowledge of digital humanities. Through these programs, NEH seeks to increase the number of humanities scholars using digital technology in their research and to broadly disseminate knowledge about advanced technology tools and methodologies relevant to the humanities.

NEH is soliciting proposals from institutions to participate in the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP). Over a period of two years, successful applicants will select newspapers—published in their state or territory between 1836 and 1922—and convert approximately 100,000 pages into digital files (primarily from microfilm), according to the technical guidelines (76-page PDF) outlined by the Library of Congress.

Deadling: January 17, 2012 for projects beginning September 2012