Category: Reports

Report: On the importance of web archiving

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From the report:

So, how can social science scholars and researchers take advantage of web archives?

Our Web Science and Digital Libraries (WS-DL) group at Old Dominion University (ODU) has been studying the challenges related to allowing researchers to create and share their own web archives for the past eight years. Our work is focused more on close reading of archived material than distant reading. For those interested in distant reading of web archives, the Archives Unleashed project, a collaboration between historians, librarians, and computer scientists, is developing excellent tools to enable researchers to perform large-scale analysis of web archives.

Read the full report here.

Report: Library Values & Privacy in our National Digital Strategies

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About the report:

The UW-Milwaukee Center for Information Policy Research, in partnership with Data & Society, along with the American Library Association’s Office of Intellectual Freedom and the New York Public Library, was awarded a National Leadership Grants for Libraries award from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) for the project “Library Values & Privacy in our National Digital Strategies: Field guides, Convenings, and Conversations.” A series of gatherings were held throughout 2017-2018 that brought together library practitioners, privacy advocates, and technology experts to discuss and debate a national roadmap for a digital privacy strategy for libraries. The culminating event — the Library Values and Privacy Summit — was held in New York City bringing together privacy experts from within and outside libraries and sparked discussions on key privacy-related issues and possible paths forward.

Read the full report here.

Report: No Bridge Too Far – Highlights from the Digital Humanities 2018 Conference

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From the report:

What would it mean for the digital humanities to build more bridges in their work? Last week nearly 700 digital humanists went to Mexico City to participate in the annual international Digital Humanities 2018 conference. The conference title was “Puentes/Bridges” – and a central question was how digital humanities can build bridges and create a more inclusive, global

Read the full report here.

Report: A Framework for Aggregating Private and Public Web Archives

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About the report:

Personal and private Web archives are proliferating due to the increase in the tools to create them and the realization that Internet Archive and other public Web archives are unable to capture personalized (e.g., Facebook) and private (e.g., banking) Web pages. We introduce a framework to mitigate issues of aggregation in private, personal, and public Web archives without compromising potential sensitive information contained in private captures.

Read the full report here.

Report: Frictionless Data – Making Research Data Quality Visible

About the report:

There is significant friction in the acquisition, sharing, and reuse of research data. It is estimated that eighty percent of data analysis is invested in the cleaning and mapping of data (Dasu and Johnson,2003). This friction hampers researchers not well versed in data preparation techniques from reusing an ever-increasing amount of data available within research data repositories. Frictionless Data is an ongoing project at Open Knowledge International focused on removing this friction. We are doing this by developing a set of tools, specifications, and best practices for describing, publishing, and validating data. The heart of this project is the “Data Package”, a containerization format for data based on existing practices for publishing open source software. This paper will report on current progress toward that goal.

Read the full report here.

Report: The Academic Book and Its Digital Dilemmas

From the post:

Focusing in particular on the arts and humanities, this article asks how, and under what conditions, the digitally mediated long-form academic publication might hold a viable future. It examines digital disruption and innovation within humanities publishing, contrasts different models and outlines some of the key challenges facing scholarly publishing in the humanities. This article examines how non-traditional entities, such as digital humanities research projects, have performed digital publishing roles and reviews possible implications for scholarly book publishing’s relationship to the wider research process. It concludes by looking at how digital or hybrid long-form publications might become more firmly established within the scholarly publishing landscape.

Read more here.

Report: Personal Archives and History

From the report:

This week, the University of Houston Libraries hosted the 2018 Personal Digital Archiving Conference (April 23-25). You can check out the Twitter conversations by searching for the #PDA18 hashtag or view the conference website (and presentation abstracts) here: https://sites.lib.uh.edu/pda18/.

On Monday, I presented on Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage with my colleagues, Dr. Gabriela Baeza Ventura and Dr. Carolina Villarroel. We talked about Recovery’s mission, our collections, and our developing US Latinx Digital Humanities programming. We thought this conference provided us with a great opportunity to talk about how important personal archives are for US Latinx history. (You can watch the video on our Facebook page here.)

Read the full report here.

Report: HathiTrust Research Center User Requirements Study White Paper

About the report:

This paper presents findings from an investigation into trends and practices in humanities and social sciences research that incorporates text data mining. As affiliates of the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC), the purpose of our study was to illuminate researcher needs and expectations for text data, tools, and training for text mining in order to better understand our current and potential user community. Results of our study have and will continue to inform development of HTRC tools and services for computational text analysis.

Read the full report here.

Report: “All of the Questions” – A Recap of the 2017 BUDSC Pre-Conference

From the report:

How do we engage students in digital scholarship and support instructors as they incorporate DH or DS practices in their traditional classes? The BUDSC pre-conference was initially convened around these concerns and charged with the task of developing a “DS Cookbook” featuring ideas, best practices, and resources for instructors looking to include digital projects within their courses. We were initially asked to reflect on questions about our own experiences: What would have been helpful to know the first time we attempted to use digital scholarship in the classroom? How can we engage students in digital scholarship with limited budget, resources, or support?

Read the full report here.

Report: Digital Resources for the History of Art Grant Program

About the report:

With nearly a decade of funding data now at our disposal, it seems an opportune moment to reflect on the shape and impact of this grant program. An internal briefing for the Kress Board of Trustees was drafted earlier this year as part of a larger conversation about the future of the field and the Foundation’s strategic priorities. We share a summary distillation of that report here, intended to reflect one committed funder’s view of the evolving field of digital art history. We hope that our perspective might shed light on that field, and on the needs and aspirations of its growing ranks of practitioners.

Read more here.