The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy has released “Fact Sheet: Big Data Across the Federal Government.” Here’s an excerpt: Below are highlights of ongoing Federal government programs that address the challenges of, and tap the opportunities afforded by, the big data revolution to advance agency missions and further scientific discovery and innovation….

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Our friends at the UK JISC have just issued a very useful new report titled “Value and Benefits of Text Mining” which looks at some of the early applications of text mining, particularly in the context of the scholarly literature, and the technical, economic, and legal barriers to large scale use of text mining technologies….

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This report briefly presents the findings and recommendations of the “Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success” project which investigated the extent to which publishing has now become a core activity of North American academic libraries and suggested ways in which further capacity could be built. “Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success: Final Research Re” by…

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Humanities and the social sciences have traditionally been disciplines aligned closely with the institutional library and its resources and services. Increasingly, in my conversations with librarians, there is a concern that while the library as a space remains popular, this masks a growing distance between the services the library provides and the needs and expectations…

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As input into the development, design, and improvement of the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC), recipients of Google’s Digital Humanities Grants were interviewed to identify issues encountered during their projects. This project was guided by the following goals: – Increase empirical understanding of how to identify materials for use by scholars. – Increase empirical understanding of…

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The SURFfoundation has released Users, Narcissism and Control—Tracking the Impact of Scholarly Publications in the 21st Century. Here’s an excerpt: This report explores the explosion of tracking tools that have accompanied the surge of web based information instruments. Is it possible to monitor ‘real-time’ how new research findings are being read, cited, used and transformed…

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We were surprised to hear during the December 16, 2011 NITLE web seminar on undergraduate digital humanities (DH) instruction a recurring motif along the lines that coding (markup and programming) is so difficult that undergraduates trained in the humanities cannot learn it quickly or successfully, and so potentially alienating and anxiety-provoking that it should be regarded as too advanced to be considered a core component of the undergraduate DH curriculum. As two undergraduate humanities majors (English Literature and Linguistics) with no prior technical background, we would like to share our own experiences with learning and using computational tools. We hope that our very positive experience will encourage faculty elsewhere to give their undergraduate students the opportunity to become deeply and seriously involved with this exciting and rewarding aspect of DH.