Search Results for: digital orientalist

This year I have had the pleasure of being involved in the “Tackling Pandemics in Early Modern Japan” transcription project organized by the University of Cambridge in collaboration with the AI platform Minna de honkoku みんなで翻刻. During the project, participants have been posting resources useful for engaging with historical Japanese documents and cursive Japanese to…

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  As a scholar who has spent nearly a decade working on a variety of digital humanities projects, my contributions to the Digital Orientalist present an opportunity to reflect on what I’ve learned through working and teaching in the field. Largely self-taught, I have had plenty of experience of building things that don’t work, or…

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This year, scholars and students across the globe have been forced to conduct research and gather materials for their projects and classes through the internet. Luckily for the field of Korean Studies, a huge amount of primary and secondary source material is available online, much of it for free. A concerted effort by the Korean…

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On the 20th of June, The Digital Orientalist held its second twitter conference, the Digital Orientalisms Twitter Conference 2020 (#DOsTC2020). There were a total of eleven presentations focusing on themes pertaining to the conducting of digital African, Asian, and Middle Eastern Studies, the digital humanities, and research in the time of pandemic.We would like to…

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From the resource: Technology changed how we create, produce, and organize our ideas. It also changed the ways in which we write a dissertation during graduate study. A dissertation is indeed a large endeavor, but it begins with small steps. It evolves over time, and small steps eventually turn complicated research into a cohesive project….

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From the CFP: Long term readers will likely be aware of The Digital Orientalist’s “Digital Orientalisms Twitter Conference” (DOsTC) which we held on June 1st, 2019. Given the cancellation of many non-virtual conferences this year, the Digital Orientalist has been receiving requests from some of our readers to hold another Twitter Conference. So without further ado, we…

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The issue of multilingualism vs lingua franca in science (and in society) is certainly very complicated, but the recent article by Gregory Crane raises some questions and a few concerns. In general, I think everybody would agree with Miran’s appeal on Humanist: “Let us invest in language diversity”. There are countless documents supporting multilingualism in…

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In a previous piece in the Digital Orientalist, Giulia Buriola went over geo-referencing examples in QGIS. Here I would like to introduce readers to another common geographic analysis software they might encounter on the market: ArcGIS, and show how this software might be applied to social scientific historical research. Readers may be familiar with this…

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