Digital Humanities Now will be taking a break for the next few weeks. On behalf of the DHNow staff, thank you for another great semester! A very special thank you goes to our dedicated community of volunteer editors-at-large for being so generous with their time and expertise. This semester’s editors-at-large included: Malithi Alahapperuma, Je-an Cedric Cruz, Avery Blankenship,…

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Simon Daisley is an independent researcher of Kalmyk Buddhism and a digital heritage practitioner based in New Zealand. Through a personal interest in Buddhism, particularly in the history of Buddhism in the Russian Empire and among the Kalmyk people, Daisley has been researching Kalmyk Buddhist monasteries (khuruls), especially those that were destroyed in the Soviet…

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Nightingale authors come from varied disciplines; I’ve seen articles by visualization scientists, sociologists, public health experts, applied ethicists, geographers, etc. This report and its accompanying infographics reflect a Venn diagram of many of those disciplines. The arrival of the trial of Mr. Derek Chauvin this month — in the city where I teach and write…

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Scholarship of early modern English (and European) anatomy has claimed that the anatomy theatre was a popular attraction in seventeenth-century London, its audience a heterogeneous mix not altogether different from the English playhouse. Read full post here. Source: Editors’ Choice: Word-Embedding Models and the Digital Dissection of Early Modern Anatomy

Voyant Tools is a popular website that offers a series of text analysis tools for examining word frequencies, patterns, and trends of a document. Although Voyant Tools supports analyzed documents in multiple languages, current tutorials and articles mainly focus on the application of Voyant Tools to English (Rockwell and Sinclair 2017). In this project, I…

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The Plant Humanities Lab is an innovative digital space that supports the interdisciplinary study of plants from the various perspectives of the arts, sciences, and humanities, to explore their extraordinary significance to human culture. Humans rely on plants for our most fundamental individual and social needs: from food, medicine, and construction to our encounters with…

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