Digital Humanities Now will be taking a break until the end of January. On behalf of the DHNow staff, thank you for another great semester! To our generous volunteer editors-at-large, thank you for dedicating your time and expertise. Your participation makes DHNow possible. This semester’s editors-at-large included: Dan Howlett, Dana Meyer, Kris Stinson, Teresa Donoso, Sarah Fay, Jajwalya Karajgikar, Morgan Lemmer-Webber,…

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Bill Caraher has recently been considering the nature of ‘legacy data’ in archaeology (Caraher 2019) (with a commentary by Andrew Reinhard). Amongst other things, he suggests there has been a shift from paper-based archives designed with an emphasis on the future to digital archives which often seem more concerned with present utility. Coincidentally, Bill’s post…

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The Shakespeare and Company Project is based on the Sylvia Beach papers at Princeton University Library. Logbooks and lending library cards trace members’ engagement with Beach’s famous lending library in Paris. Members included literary luminaries Gertrude Stein, James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, and Simone de Beauvoir, as well as students, businessmen, and French girls with English governesses….

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Digital Tools as Critical Theory: Edu-Factory to Digital Humanities “What once was the factory, is now the university.” This, among other hypotheses, served as a rallying cry and point of departure for the now defunct international Edu-factory Collective. Born online, networked in its organization, and relentless in its criticism of the university’s thorough neoliberalization, the…

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[This is a working draft of a chapter in progress for an edited collection.] Data-Driven History Digital historians are well-familiar with notion that the larger community of historians generally has been skeptical of and cautious about data-driven scholarship. The controversies surrounding Robert Fogel and Stanley Engerman’s 1974 work, Time on the Cross: the Economics of…

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After my panel presentation at #4C2019 on “Critical Digital Archiving Against the Grain: Precarities, Negotiations, and Possibilities,” one of the attendees came up to me, appreciated my research area, and asked me enthusiastically, “Have you ever imagined how the platform for digital archive built by Non-Westerners would look like?” I just couldn’t answer this question…

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