Following the University’s acquisition of the Cardiff Rare Books Collection, the School of English, Communication and Philosophy at Cardiff University invites applications for a Professorship in English Literature, tenable from 1st September 2012, or as soon as possible thereafter. The successful candidate will be a leading expert in the History of the Book and Material Culture and in Digital Humanities, with an international portfolio of research publications in English Literature. You will be expected to make a substantial contribution to the School’s Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research by pioneering the development of initiatives relating to the Rare Books Collection.

Intended for long-form scholarship, [Scalar] particularly facilitates work with visual materials and dynamic media (such as video and audio)… it enables writers to assemble content from multiple sources and juxtapose them with their own compositions.

Switch to OpenStreetMap and discover how you can build beautiful maps from the world’s best map data. We give you the data for free; you can make any map you like with it. Or benefit from the expertise of those already using OpenStreetMap. Host it on your hardware, or elsewhere. You have control. switch2osm.org explains how to make the switch – from first principles to technical how-tos.

Many users have asked for support for advanced annotation tasks in ELAN, ideally using LEXUS to build, access and expand a lexical database. Making this possible is the objective of TLA’s newest project called LEXAN, a modular annotation support framework coupled to a new interface in ELAN. It will support different “annotyzers”,  i.e. modules that produce annotation suggestions for the researcher, including machine-learning modules.

The Brown University Library and the TAPAS Project are seeking a
developer to lead the technical implementation of the TAPAS service.
Working with other members of the Brown Digital Repository development
team, the developer will install and customize an instance of
Islandora (Drupal and Fedora), and will develop functionality for
publishing, describing, analyzing, visualizing, and sharing scholarly
texts. The developer will collaborate with Brown systems and
development staff, staff at Wheaton College, and other TAPAS
participants, to create, refine, and implement ideas for building the
service, and will work with those groups to test and roll out new web
applications.

The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) project is looking to engage the services of a specialist in the following scientific applications support role. The position can be filled via a consulting contract or on a sub-award basis, depending on an applicant’s particular circumstance, and compensation will be commensurate with experience and qualifications. This person will be responsible for the selection, adaptation, and deployment of Digital Humanities computational science tools/capabilities on the National Science Foundation’s XSEDE resources and for the development and support of projects by researchers and collaborations in Digital Humanities that will make effective use of these capabilities.

We warmly welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. Themes could include digital text, linguistics technology, imaging and visualization, linked data, open access, geographic analysis, serious gaming and any other digital or quantitative methods. While we welcome high-quality application papers discussing individual projects, the series also hopes to accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information scientists or digital humanists, and have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

When discussing orphan works, two basic definitional questions arise: (1) exactly what is the “orphan works” problem?, and (2) what is the size of this problem? The answers to these two questions are central to understanding how proposed solutions work to remedy the situation. Though both questions have long been posed, the answer to the first (what is the “orphan works”; problem) can vary based on the type of work or the particular user, and the answer to the second (what is the size of the problem) remains difficult to state with precision. This paper explores both and identifies areas where further research is needed.