Call for Submissions for the AHR Prize for the Best Digital Article.

The American Historical Review invites submissions of online works of digital historical scholarship to be considered for the newly established AHR Prize in Digital Historical Scholarship. The winning submission will be published online by Oxford University Press in April 2014 as a fully peer-reviewed, fully citable work of original scholarship and as an integral part of the AHR. It will, therefore, be included in the table of contents, along with a short abstract, in the April 2014 issue of the AHR. The deadline for submission is March 1, 2013. All entries will be considered by the editor of the AHR and reviewed and refereed by the editorial board of the AHR and by external referees.

We were surprised to hear during the December 16, 2011 NITLE web seminar on undergraduate digital humanities (DH) instruction a recurring motif along the lines that coding (markup and programming) is so difficult that undergraduates trained in the humanities cannot learn it quickly or successfully, and so potentially alienating and anxiety-provoking that it should be regarded as too advanced to be considered a core component of the undergraduate DH curriculum. As two undergraduate humanities majors (English Literature and Linguistics) with no prior technical background, we would like to share our own experiences with learning and using computational tools. We hope that our very positive experience will encourage faculty elsewhere to give their undergraduate students the opportunity to become deeply and seriously involved with this exciting and rewarding aspect of DH.

Quinn Dombrowski and I are writing a manual on using the Drupal 7 CMS for digital humanities projects.  Titled unimaginatively Drupal for Humanists, it is meant to provide first an understanding of how to install and configure Drupal and then a series of case studies representative of Drupal’s use in humanities research and the library.

The general focus of the Junior Fellows Program is on increasing access to the collections and an awareness of the Library’s copyright, legal and special collections and digital initiatives.  In the past, projects have been developed to make the collections  better known and accessible to researchers including scholars, students, teachers, knowledge creators, and the general public. Interns help the Library expose unprocessed collections, participate in digital projects, provide additional services to Congress and the public, and make our collections more immediately accessible to scholars. Interns work under the direction of Library curators and specialists in various divisions. In the past, summer interns have identified hundreds of historical, literary, artistic, cinematic and musical gems representing rich cultural, creative, and intellectual resources. United States citizens currently enrolled in undergraduate or graduate school.

Today we’re delighted to announce that Zotero 3.0 has officially arrived Zotero 3.0 marks a major departure from previous versions, most notably with the new ability run outside the Firefox browser. Available for Mac, Windows, and Linux, this standalone version of Zotero contains all the great functionality of the old Firefox-based Zotero but now enables users to integrate Zotero into browsers other than Firefox like Google Chrome and Apple Safari. To all you Firefox lovers out there, no need to worry! Zotero continues to work within Firefox, and even if you choose to run the standalone version, it will talk to Firefox, too.