The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) project is looking to engage the services of a specialist in the following scientific applications support role. The position can be filled via a consulting contract or on a sub-award basis, depending on an applicant’s particular circumstance, and compensation will be commensurate with experience and qualifications. This person will be responsible for the selection, adaptation, and deployment of Digital Humanities computational science tools/capabilities on the National Science Foundation’s XSEDE resources and for the development and support of projects by researchers and collaborations in Digital Humanities that will make effective use of these capabilities.

We warmly welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. Themes could include digital text, linguistics technology, imaging and visualization, linked data, open access, geographic analysis, serious gaming and any other digital or quantitative methods. While we welcome high-quality application papers discussing individual projects, the series also hopes to accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information scientists or digital humanists, and have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

When discussing orphan works, two basic definitional questions arise: (1) exactly what is the “orphan works” problem?, and (2) what is the size of this problem? The answers to these two questions are central to understanding how proposed solutions work to remedy the situation. Though both questions have long been posed, the answer to the first (what is the “orphan works”; problem) can vary based on the type of work or the particular user, and the answer to the second (what is the size of the problem) remains difficult to state with precision. This paper explores both and identifies areas where further research is needed.

We’re going to be shining a light on the failures that we individually and we collectively have had as project teams, institutions, and maybe even the sector as a whole.

Each Fail will present a short 7-10 minute slot followed by 10 minutes

Assistant/Associate Professor, Digital Humanities, Department of English; Ball State University; Muncie, Indiana. Tenure-track faculty position available August 17, 2012. Responsibilities: teaching and developing undergraduate and graduate courses in rhetoric and writing and/or literature that have a digital humanities focus; submitting external grant proposals in digital humanities; contributing to Ball State’s and the department’s mission to engage students in digital and emerging media; teaching a wide array of classes in the department For more information, please go to http://www.bsu.edu/hrs/jobpostings.

This study considers the effect of large-scale deposit on scholarly research publication and dissemination (sharing of research outputs), beginning with the analysis of publishers and institutions managing repositories and their sustainability. The study associates costs with specific activities, performed by key actors involved in research registration, certification, dissemination and digital management: authors, the scholarly community, editors, publishers, libraries, readers and funding agencies. Contrary to most of the existing literature, the study analyses cost structures of individual organizations. The focus of this study is therefore to provide context for the costs to specific organizations and to their choices in terms of scale and scope.