From the resource: The The Programming Historian has enjoyed a huge surge of new lessons and translations this past year. This work wouldn’t be possible without our ever-growing community of authors, reviewers, and editors. But as teams get bigger, one needs to take special care to organize around that size. This post will highlight three behind-the-scenes, technical changes…

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From the resource: Histograms are a way to summarize a numeric variable. They use counts to aggregate similar values together and show you the overall distribution. However, they can be sensitive to parameter choices! We’re going to take you step by step through the considerations with lots of data visualizations. Read the full resource here.

From the post: The colorized images you see here come from the NYPL’s large collection of late 19th century Japanese photography, taken by photographers like the Italian-British Felice Beato and his Japanese student Kimbei, who “assisted Beato in the hand-coloring of photographs until 1863,” then “set up his own large and flourishing studio in Yokohama…

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From the post: I’ve recently published version 0.3.0 of my USAboundaries R package to CRAN. USAboundaries provides access to spatial data for U.S. counties, states, cities, congressional districts, and zip codes. Of course you can easily get contemporary boundaries from lots of places, but this package lets you specify dates and get the locations for…

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From the resource: This is the last in a series of posts which constitute a “lit review” of sorts, documenting the range of methods scholars are using to compute the distribution of topics over time. The strategies I am considering are: Average of topic weights per year (First Post) Smoothing or regression analysis (Second Post)…

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From the resource: This is the third in a series of posts which constitute a “lit review” of sorts, documenting the range of methods scholars are using to compute the distribution of topics over time. Graphs of topic prevalence over time are some of the most ubiquitous in digital humanities discussions of topic modeling. They…

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From the resource: This is the second in a series of posts which constitute a “lit review” of sorts, documenting the range of methods scholars are using to compute the distribution of topics over time. Graphs of topic prevalence over time are some of the most ubiquitous in digital humanities discussions of topic modeling. They…

Read More