Category: Resources

Resource: Hand-Colored Photographs from 19th Century Japan

From the post:

The colorized images you see here come from the NYPL’s large collection of late 19th century Japanese photography, taken by photographers like the Italian-British Felice Beato and his Japanese student Kimbei, who “assisted Beato in the hand-coloring of photographs until 1863,” then “set up his own large and flourishing studio in Yokohama in 1881.” The archive provides “a rich resource for the understanding of the political, social, economic, and artistic history of Asia from the 1870s to the early 20th century.” These images date from between 1890 and 1909, by which time much of Japan had already been extensively westernized in dress, architecture, and style of government.

Read more here.

Resource: USAboundaries v0.3.0 Released

From the post:

I’ve recently published version 0.3.0 of my USAboundaries R package to CRAN. USAboundaries provides access to spatial data for U.S. counties, states, cities, congressional districts, and zip codes. Of course you can easily get contemporary boundaries from lots of places, but this package lets you specify dates and get the locations for historical county and state boundaries as well as city locations.

Read the full post here.

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Resource: Ways to Compute Topics over Time, Part 4

From the resource:

This is the last in a series of posts which constitute a “lit review” of sorts, documenting the range of methods scholars are using to compute the distribution of topics over time. The strategies I am considering are:

Average of topic weights per year (First Post)
Smoothing or regression analysis (Second Post)
Proportion of total weights per year (Third Post)
Prevalence of the top topic per year (Final Post)

To explore a range of strategies for computing and visualizing topics over time from a standard LDA model, I am using a model I created from my dissertation materials.

Read the full resource here.

Resource: Ways to Compute Topics over Time, Part 3

From the resource:

This is the third in a series of posts which constitute a “lit review” of sorts, documenting the range of methods scholars are using to compute the distribution of topics over time.

Graphs of topic prevalence over time are some of the most ubiquitous in digital humanities discussions of topic modeling. They are used as a mechanism for identifying spikes in discourse and for depicting the relationship between the various discourses in a corpus.

Topic prevalence over time is not, however, a measure that is returned with the standard modeling tools such as MALLET or Gensim. Instead, it is computed after the fact by combining the model data with external metadata and aggregating the model results. And, as it turns out, there are a number of ways that the data can be aggregated and displayed.

Read the full post here.

Resource: Full Draft of Theory & Craft of Digital Preservation

From the resource:

This weekend I’m submitting the full draft of the manuscript for my book The Theory and Craft of Digital Preservation to the publisher, Johns Hopkins University Press.

I’ve had a lot of fun working on this on nights and weekends over the last year. I have also learned a ton from everyone who has read drafts of the work in progress.

I’ve had a few folks reach out to me after reading parts of drafts and say things like “I’d love to read more of this. When will it be out?” I’m not sure exactly how long it will take for the next round of review and all the improvements that will come from working with a great press. With that said, drafts of the entire book are now online. Instead of having folks pick through my previous blog posts with the links, I figured I would put them all together in order in this post.

Read more here.

Resource: Ways to Compute Topics over Time, Part 2

From the resource:

This is the second in a series of posts which constitute a “lit review” of sorts, documenting the range of methods scholars are using to compute the distribution of topics over time.

Graphs of topic prevalence over time are some of the most ubiquitous in digital humanities discussions of topic modeling. They are used as a mechanism for identifying spikes in discourse and for depicting the relationship between the various discourses in a corpus.

Read more here.

Resource: This Political Moment – Resources for Educators in the Trump Era

From the post:

Educators have long been responsible for supporting the growth and development of all young people. The job of designing engaging lessons, promoting respectful discussion, creating an inclusive classroom, and preparing youth for life in democratic society is never an easy one. We expect educators to perform these and countless other feats on a daily basis. And, this particular political moment is especially challenging. Characterized by record-high indicators of polarization and ideological discord among our major political parties, this political moment has made educators’ routine job duties remarkably challenging and ever-important. What follows is a brief overview of a few of the significant challenges that face educators today. This document also provides a handful of supplementary resources to support equitable teaching and learning in this political moment (accessible through the open-access hyperlinks).

Read the full post here.

Resource: Programming Historian Highlights from the First Half of 2017

From the post:

The first half of 2017 is already coming to an end, and we thought it would be a great time to highlight the new lessons that have been published in the past six months.

The big story has been the tremendous success of our Spanish Language Team, Maria José Afanador-Llach, Victor Gayol, and Antonio Rojas Castro, who have translated 25 tutorials into Spanish. This ongoing work has been a massive undertaking, and a tremendous coordinated effort by the Spanish Team and the growing network of reviewers who have contributed to the success of the translation.

Read more here.

Resource: Justice and Digital Archives: A Working Bibliography

If we can’t see the ethical stakes (+ power relations) in digital archives we are going to do violence.

Do better.

Born of frustration and still very much a work in progress (gotta get the kids to school)…I have much more to include and I welcome your suggestions via twitter @profwernimont #justDigitalArchives

Readings

Archives So White Introduction and Bibliography, Issues and Advocacy Research Posts https://issuesandadvocacy.wordpress.com/2016/04/18/archivessowhite-intro-bibliography/

Jane E. Anderson, Law, Knowledge, Culture: The Production of Indigenous Knowledge in Intellectual Property Law. Edward Elgar Press: Cheltenham, United Kingdom. 2009

— ‘‘Chuck a Copyright on it’: Dilemmas of Digital Return and the Possibilities for Traditional Knowledge Licenses and Labels’. With Kim Christen. Museum Anthropology Review 7, (1-2) Spring-Fall 2013; pp 105-126.

 

Continue Reading: Justice and Digital Archives: A Working Bibliography – Jacqueline Wernimont : Network Weaver, Scholar, Digitrix

Resource: tidycensus R Package

From the resource:

tidycensus is an R package that allows users to interface with the US Census Bureau’s decennial Census and five-year American Community APIs and return tidyverse-ready data frames, optionally with simple feature geometry included…tidycensus is designed to help R users get Census data that is pre-prepared for exploration within the tidyverse, and optionally spatially with sf.

Access resource here.