Save Scholarly Ideas, Not the Publishing Industry (a rant) « Social Media Collective.

… But what I want to know is this:

  • What are *you* doing to resist the corporate stranglehold over scholarly knowledge in order to make your knowledge broadly accessible?
  • What are the five things that you think that other scholars should do to help challenge the status quo?

Please, I beg you, regardless of whether or not we can save a dying industry, let’s collectively figure out how to save the value that prompted its creation: making scholarly knowledge widely accessible

The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010, signed by President Obama earlier this year, calls upon OSTP to coordinate with agencies to develop policies that assure widespread public access to and long-term stewardship of the results of federally funded unclassified research. Towards that goal, OSTP last week released two Requests for Information (RFI) soliciting public input on long term preservation of and public access to the results of federally funded research, including digital data and peer-reviewed scholarly publications.

OSTP previously conducted a public consultation about policy options for expanding public access to federally funded peer-reviewed

By Elijah Meeks

…This is fundamentally an argument directed at administrators looking to support digital humanities work at their universities and not researchers looking to perform digital humanities work, but it is meant to push that latter group toward agitating for action from the former. I’ve had enough experience now with digital humanities projects to know that when you’re collaborating with computer scientists or contracting developer resources without a sense of standardized, centralized resources, then the data, code and tool decisions tend to be made based on expediency or a desire to experiment with new, unsupported and/or experimental technologies.