I’ve taken the ill-advised approach of using the Coronavirus as a topic to frame the exercises in my computer programming class this semester. I say “ill-advised” because given the impact that COVID has been having on students I’ve been thinking they probably need a way to escape news of the virus by way of writing code, rather…

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My recent posts have focused on the biblical text and ways to access it online. Here I will turn to the material culture from the ancient environs in which the Bible developed. My focus is oriented more toward resources for digital publication and teaching. I will highlight a select few sites with great resources for…

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In a previous post I briefly presented some of the richest and most commonly used online resources for Korean Studies. There I suggested that despite the plethora of premodern textual material that is freely available online, it remained to be seen what kind of digital humanities work scholars of Korea would be able to produce. Many factors…

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UCLDH is proud to announce its support for Programming Historian, by joining their Institutional Partnership Programme. For the past decade, Programming Historian has been an integral part of the digital humanities teaching and learning infrastructure, with more than 140 open access peer-reviewed tutorials published in 4 languages. With many universities around the world still not…

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This week saw the publication of Doing Public Humanities, a new collection of essays edited by Susan Smulyan and published by Routledge. Here’s the official book description from the publisher’s website: Doing Public Humanities explores the cultural landscape from disruptive events to websites, from tours to exhibits, from after school arts programs to archives, giving…

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The weather prevents me from being there physically, but this is a transcript of my remarks for “Varieties of Digital Humanities,” MLA, Jan 5, 2018. Using numbers to understand cultural history is often called “cultural analytics”—or sometimes, if we’re talking about literary history in particular, “distant reading.” The practice is older than either name: sociologists,…

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The Conference on translingual and transcultural digital humanities is hosting a one-day Text Reuse Workshop for participants interested in learning more about semi-automatic detection of text reuse in digital textual corpora. The workshop builds on eTRAP’s research activities, some of which deploy Marco Büchler’s TRACER tool. Source: Opportunity: Text reuse workshop at DH Estonia 2015