Author: Author on Source

Laura Crossley is a Digital History Fellow at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media and a Ph.D. student in the Department of History at George Mason University.

CFP: ACH2019 Conference

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From the CFP:

The inaugural Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) conference will take place in Pittsburgh, PA, July 23-26, 2019 at the Pittsburgh Marriott City Center…

ACH is the United States-based constituent organization in the Alliance for Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO). The ACH 2019 conference, in partnership with Keystone DH, provides a forum for conversations on an expansive definition of digital humanities in a broad array of subject areas, methods, and communities of practice.

Read the full CFP here.

Job: TT Assistant Professor in Literature Specializing in Digital Humanities, Temple University

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From the ad:

The English Department at Temple University invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in literature specializing in any method of digital humanities research, broadly conceived. The position is open to applicants in any literary field from the nineteenth century to the present, including global, British, and American literatures. Teaching responsibilities include a 2/2 load with a mix of undergraduate and graduate courses.

Read the full ad here.

Job: TT Assistant Professor of Digital History of the Ancient Mediterranean, George Mason University

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From the ad:

Candidates for this position will be expected to maintain an active scholarly agenda in the field of digital ancient history. Candidates will have a 2/2 teaching load, and will teach undergraduate courses on Greek and Roman history and in digital history, as well other undergraduate and graduate courses in their areas of research interest. The successful applicant will be expected to contribute to the history major’s concentration in digital history and should have a research interest in the digital humanities. This can include, but is not limited to, GIS and mapping, 3D modeling or VR/AR, computational text analysis, network analysis, digital collections, and digital archaeology.

Read the full ad here.

CFP: Terms of Service – Affective Labor and Alt-Ac Careers

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From the CFP:

We are looking for a collection of short essays (4000-4500 words) that critically engage the affective labor of being an alt-ac or staff inside or outside the academy. We are particularly interested in submissions from alt-acs who are POC, LGBTQIA, and/or disabled, as the intersection of gender, race, sexual orientation, and disability heavily impact the affective labor expectations and experiences. 300-word abstracts are due by October 31, 2018. Acceptances will be sent out by November 16, 2019, with final essays required by July 1, 2019.

Read the full CFP here.

Editors’ Choice: The Tate Uses Wikipedia for Artist Biographies, and I’m OK With It

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Recently, several folks on Twitter have noted their displeasure that the Tate appears to be linking to Wikipedia articles in lieu of authoring their own written biographies of artists represented in their collections.

I… actually don’t have a problem with what the Tate is doing.

A screenshot of the Tate’s citation of Wikipedia

A screenshot of the Tate’s citation of Wikipedia on an overview web page for Jackson Pollock.

Except for a few unique institutions founded around a single artist’s estate, very few art museums really have the authority, or, frankly, the mission, to be authorities on the biographies of the artist in their collections. It would be one thing if the Tate were deferring to Wikipedia articles about the unique objects within it’s collection. Bendor Grovesnor erroneously suggests that the Tate copying and pasting this for their collection catalog entries, but they are not. Instead, they’re using it for that most unsatisfying categories of copy expelled by art museums: the artist biography.

As a graduate student and curatorial fellow at the National Gallery of Art, I spent hours and hours of expert time drafting biographies of artists represented in that museum’s Dutch collections. This was almost always a secondary literature review (thank goodness, no responsible museum board will fund research trips to archives to write three-paragraph biographical blurbs!) I and my colleagues generated some quite rich and educational copy for the website, and it was a lovely learning experience… for us, the students.

However, except for the most minor artists, we were mostly just rewording and enriching well-covered biographies from the Benezit Dictionary of Artists or Grove® Art Online. Hours of expert research time was basically spent reinventing the wheel – something that absolutely did not have to be done for ridiculously well-biographied artists like Rembrandt. Any one of these hours could have been better applied researching and communicating what was unique to our museum: the specific objects in the collection itself.

Read the full post here.

Resource: Rapid Response Research

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From the resource:

Rapid Response Research (RRR) projects are quickly deployed scholarly interventions in pressing political, social, and cultural crises. Together, teams of researchers, technologists, librarians, faculty, and students can pool their existing skills and knowledges to make swift and thoughtful contributions through digital scholarship in these times of crisis. The temporality of a rapid response is relative and will vary depending on the situation, from a matter of days, to a week, or several weeks. Our model below is relevant to the variable timelines a situation might require, but it bears remembering that a crisis itself has an immediacy, and that RRR projects, accordingly, bring with them a pressure to respond with intensity and speed. Torn Apart/Separados is an example of RRR. While the recommendations below are based on RRR data narratives, many elements could be more broadly applicable to other types of RRR.

Read the full resource here.

Job: Digital Initiatives Projects Librarian, University of Alberta

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From the ad:

The University of Alberta Libraries (UAL), with a long tradition of technological innovation and service excellence, seeks a dynamic and engaged professional to play a key role in the planning and execution of a growing program of digital library initiatives.

Reporting to the Head, Library Publishing and Digital Production Services, and working within a highly engaged team-based environment, the successful candidate proposes, guides, monitors and assesses a variety of digital library projects, with a particular focus on the UAL’s digitization program and library publishing activities, eg. open journal publishing and open educational resources (OER). The successful candidate will participate in and shape all phases of the planning and development of digital library projects in these areas, including the development of business cases and project plans, organizing and implementing workflows, coordinating project activities, communication planning and delivery, training, outreach, quality control, and assessment. The successful candidate will liaise and collaborate with Canadian and international communities of practice in order to establish, enhance and improve publishing and digitization services at UAL.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor in English (Quantitative Methods), Emory University

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From the ad:

The Department of English and the Institute for Quantitative Theory and Methods at Emory University invite applications for a tenured or tenure-track faculty member in English with a specialization in quantitative methods of literary analysis to begin fall 2019.

Required: PhD by time of appointment. We seek an exceptional, active researcher in any area of English-language literary history with strong interdisciplinary experience. The successful applicant will teach courses in literary study, digital humanities, and quantitative methods at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. We are especially interested in applicants with expertise in computational analysis/cultural analytics/text mining

Read the full ad here.

Editors’ Choice: ‘Making such bargain’: Transcribe Bentham and the quality and cost-effectiveness of crowdsourced transcription

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We (Tim Causer, Kris Grint, Anna-Maria Sichani, and me!) have recently published an article in Digital Scholarship in the Humanities on the economics of crowdsourcing, reporting on the Transcribe Bentham project, which is formally published here:

Alack, due to our own economic situation, its behind a paywall there. Its also embargoed for two years in our institutional repository (!). But I’ve just been alerted to the fact that the license of this journal allows the author to put the “post-print on the authors personal website immediately”. Others publishing in DSH may also not be aware of this clause in the license!

So here it is, for free download, for you to grab and enjoy in PDF.

I’ll stick the abstract here. It will help people find it!

In recent years, important research on crowdsourcing in the cultural heritage sector has been published, dealing with topics such as the quantity of contributions made by volunteers, the motivations of those who participate in such projects, the design and establishment of crowdsourcing initiatives, and their public engagement value. This article addresses a gap in the literature, and seeks to answer two key questions in relation to crowdsourced transcription: (1) whether volunteers’ contributions are of a high enough standard for creating a publicly accessible database, and for use in scholarly research; and (2) if crowdsourced transcription makes economic sense, and if the investment in launching and running such a project can ever pay off. In doing so, this article takes the award-winning crowdsourced transcription initiative, Transcribe Bentham, which began in 2010, as its case study. It examines a large data set, namely, 4,364 checked and approved transcripts submitted by volunteers between 1 October 2012 and 27 June 2014. These data include metrics such as the time taken to check and approve each transcript, and the number of alterations made to the transcript by Transcribe Bentham staff. These data are then used to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of the initiative, and its potential impact upon the ongoing production of The Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham at UCL. Finally, the article proposes more general points about successfully planning humanities crowdsourcing projects, and provides a framework in which both the quality of their outputs and the efficiencies of their cost structures can be evaluated.

 

Read the full piece here.

Job: Open-Rank Tenure-Track Faculty (Four Positions), Syracuse University iSchool

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From the ad:

Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies (The iSchool, ischool.syr.edu) seeks scholars and leaders to fill four open-rank tenure-track faculty positions to start in Fall 2019. Successful candidates will have a productive program of research in an information-related field and be able to contribute to the development of students and courses in our degree programs in information management and technology, data science and data analytics, library and information science (including school media) and information science and technology.

The successful candidates will join our “Faculty of One”: a highly collegial environment that stresses interdisciplinary collaboration amongst our school’s faculty and with other members of the university community and beyond. Our research and teaching often adopt a socio-technical approach, recognizing that important problems are not simply technical nor just about people, but rather require both social and technological insights. We seek applicants whose topic areas and skills adopt this philosophy, and who can speak to overlapping areas within the school.

Read the full ad here.