I am a Computer Scientist by trade but have a strong interest in connections of my trade to other parts of the academy, such as the Arts, Humanities, Science and Engineering. So, when I saw that there was an online workshop called Critical Code Studies, I decided to go in head first by requesting participation in…

Read More

“What is/are (the) Digital Humanities?” by Elijah Meeks This morning I gave a presentation on the role of data visualization in DH work. The annotated slides can be found on Google Docs here.             “How and why study big cultural data” by Lev Manovich Presentation at Data Mining and Visualization for the Humanities symposium, NYU, March…

Read More

A colleague drew my attention to Nicola Osborne’s liveblog of the very interesting event at the University of Edinburgh on 24 February 2012, Digital Scholarship: A Day of Ideas. It is wonderful to see that Edinburgh University, which, through EDINA and other activities, has made such important contributions to the growth of digital scholarship over…

Read More

Ted Underwood’s recent posts about literary and non-literary diction between 1700-1900, and the various discussions they sparked, including Katherine Harris’s post on gender and DH archives, have had me thinking a lot about cultural poetics and the middle distance. In 19th-century studies, most DH projects have tended to operate at two different scales: large-scale text analysis projects (associated with so-called…

Read More

Last week I attended the Association of American Geographers Annual Conference and heard a talk by Robert Groves, Director of the US Census Bureau. Aside the impressiveness of the bureau’s work I was struck by how Groves conceived of visualisations as requiring either fast thinking or slow thinking. Fast thinking data visualisations offer a clear message without the need for the viewer to spend…

Read More

University Distinguished Professor Salman Rushdie and Erika Farr, digital archives coordinator in the Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library (MARBL) discuss how computers and other technology affect Rushdie’s writing and creative process. This builds on previous conversations and addresses new developments such as Rushdie’s acquisition of an iPhone and the ways in which mobile computing has an impact on his work. In addition, given Rushdie’s work on his memoir and his use of his paper and digital archives in MARBL, the discussion turns to the ways in which archival science and archival access changes the way he uses his own archives.

Because of my interest in both history and games, I’m always on the look-out for good writing or new takes on how to bring elements of the gaming world into the framework of historical inquiry.  Increasingly, I’m finding my best sources of this kind of reading from my Twitter stream, as was the case when Shawn Graham (@electricarchaeo) pointed me towards an article in the recent edition of the Canadian Game Studies Association journal, ‘Loading…‘, titled ‘Beyond the ‘Historical’ Simulation: Using Theories of History to Inform Scholarly Game Design‘.