The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010, signed by President Obama earlier this year, calls upon OSTP to coordinate with agencies to develop policies that assure widespread public access to and long-term stewardship of the results of federally funded unclassified research. Towards that goal, OSTP issued the two RFIs soliciting public input on long-term preservation of and public access to the results of federally funded research, including digital data and peer-reviewed scholarly publications.

We encourage stakeholders to carefully consider the questions in the RFIs and provide comments to the addresses specified. Soon after the conclusion of the comment periods, OSTP will make all comments available on its website (including the names of the authors and their institutional affiliations, so please do not include any proprietary or confidential information when

The Humanities Digital Workshop at Washington University in St. Louis invites applications for a three-year early-career fellowship in digital humanities, to begin July 1, 2012. We seek scholars with expertise in any of a broad range of humanities topics and methods — quantitative history, network analysis, topic-modeling, statistical approaches to book history, lexicography, computer-assisted stylistics, text-processing, or human-computer interaction. The fellow’s research program should employ analysis of digitized texts or data to extend or contest current understandings of literary, political, social, or cultural history. Candidates must have completed their doctorates after 2008, and must have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. before July 1, 2012

Assistant Professor of English with specialty in 19th-century British and Anglophone literatures with additional specialization in digital humanities, tenure track, beginning August 2012.  Duties and responsibilities include teaching courses in literary studies and in the Digital Technology and Culture undergraduate degree program, as well as graduate courses in nineteenth-century Anglophone literatures and digital humanities (2-2 teaching load).

Cambridge University Library is seeking to appoint a suitably qualified candidate with an interest and relevant experience in digital libraries or digital humanities to work within its digital library team from early 2012. The Foundations Project is a strategic initiative of the Library, which aims to establish a state-of-the-art infrastructure for the production, preservation and online delivery of digitised content from its world-class collections. The first iteration of the digital library is online at http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/.

This book brings together a group of international experts to consider the following key issues:
• What is the role of digital resources in the research life cycle?
• Do the arts and humanities face a ‘data deluge’?
• How are digital collections to be sustained over the long term?
• How is use and impact to be assessed?
• What is the role of digital collections in the ‘digital economy’?
• How is public engagement with digital cultural heritage materials to be assessed and supported?