Real-world data are messy. Relationships between two variables can take on an infinite number of forms, and while one doesn’t see, say, umbrella-shaped data very often, strange things can happen. When scientists talk about correlations or associations between variables, they’re usually referring to one very specific form of relationship–namely, a linear one. The assumption is that most associations between pairs of variables are reasonably well captured by positing that one variable increases in proportion to the other, with some added noise. In reality, of course, many associations aren’t linear, or even approximately so. For instance, many associations are cyclical (e.g., hours at work versus day of week), or curvilinear (e.g., heart attacks become precipitously more frequent past middle age), and so on.

Detecting a non-linear association is potentially just

Linguists and others interested in more in-depth information about the Omaha language may view the working database behind the Omaha Ponca Digital Dictionary. This database is a work in progress.

Rhode Island School of Design seeks a forward-thinking artist/designer, educator, and scholar for the position of Assistant Professor in its highly regarded Graduate Department of Digital + Media. The successful candidate will be an artist/designer working with emergent technologies and engaged in understanding their relationship to other media, disciplines and debates within contemporary theory and reflexive practice.