Category: Reports

Report: Common Ground — Exploring Compatibilities Between the Linked Data Models of the Library of Congress and OCLC

From the post:

The Library of Congress (LC) and OCLC Research have released the white paper, “Common Ground: Exploring Compatibilities Between the Linked Data Models of the Library of Congress and OCLC.” The paper, written by Carol Jean Godby (OCLC) and Ray Denenberg (LC), serves as an executive summary, published in advance of a “more detailed technical analysis that will be released later this year.”

Source: RESOURCE: Common Ground: Exploring Compatibilities Between the Linked Data Models of the Library of Congress and OCLC

Report: The HEFCE report on Open Access Monographs: some reflections

From the post:

The environment surrounding open access to monographs was significantly advanced today by the release of a report commissioned by the UK’s Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), a quango (quasi-autonomous non-governmental organisation) that translates the government’s higher education budget allocation into usable funds. In April 2014, HEFCE announced that eligibility to receive future funding through its “quality-related” (QR) stream would depend exclusively upon the assessment of green open access material: a mandate. Specifically, authors must deposit the accepted version of their articles at the time of acceptance (Higher Education Funding Council for England 2014, para.17–19). However, monographs ‘and other-long form publications’, edited collections, non-text outputs and data are all excluded from this mandate (Higher Education Funding Council for England 2014, para.14).

Source: The HEFCE report on Open Access Monographs: some reflections

Report: What’s Ahead for DPLA: Our New Strategic Plan

From the report:

The Digital Public Library of America launched on April 18, 2013, less than two years ago. And what a couple of years it has been. From a staff of three people, a starting slate of two million items, and 500 contributing institutions, we are now an organization of 12, with over eight million items from 1,300 contributing institutions. We have materials from all 50 states—and from around the world—in a remarkable 400 languages. Within our collection are millions of books and photographs, maps of all shapes and sizes, material culture and works of art, the products of science and medicine, and rare documents, postcards, and media.

But focusing on these numbers and their growth, while gratifying and a signal DPLA is thriving, is perhaps less important than what the numbers represent. DPLA has always been a community effort, and that community, which became active in the planning phase to support the idea of a noncommercial effort to bring together American libraries, archives, and museums, and to make their content freely available to the world, has strengthened even more since 2013. A truly national network and digital platform is emerging, although we still have much to do. A strong commitment to providing open access to our shared cultural heritage, and a deeply collaborative spirit, is what drives us every day.

Source: DPLA: What’s Ahead for DPLA: Our New Strategic Plan

Report: Harnessing the Power of Technology at Public Research Universities

From the announcement:

Our researchers at Ithaka S+R, with funding from Lumina Foundation, undertook a study over the course of the 2013/2014 academic year to understand the current environment for public research universities. We interviewed 214 individuals, including academic administrators, directors of online learning, chief financial officers, career services staff, and department chairs, and we discovered clear areas where PFN institutions can do more to stimulate transformational change.

The resulting report, Technology-Enhanced Education at Public Flagship Universities: Opportunities and Challenges, explores how ten member institutions of the Public Flagships Network (PFN) are pursuing solutions for their campuses.

Read the report: Harnessing the Power of Technology at Public Research Universities

Report: CNI Digital Scholarship Centers Report and Web Resource

From the announcement:

An emerging trend that CNI has been highlighting for the past few years is the establishment of digital scholarship centers or labs in universities and colleges. We invited participation in a workshop to document the current centers and identify good practice, in April, 2014, and 24 institutions who had centers up and running responded to our call. Each participating center completed a template describing its mission, a key project, types of staff available, and services offered. The workshop included sessions on describing how the center had been established, the types of staff involved, the range of services, links to teaching and learning (as links to research were a given), and organizational issues.

We are releasing today our web resource on Digital Scholarship Centers that includes a report of the workshop, the slides associated with presentations given at the workshop, and the descriptions of centers contributed by each institution that participated.

Source: CNI Digital Scholarship Centers Report and Web Resource. Access the report here.

Report: The ContentMine Scraping Stack — Literature-scale Content Mining with Community-maintained Collections of Declarative Scrapers

From the post:

Successfully mining scholarly literature at scale is inhibited by technical and political barriers that have been only partially addressed by publishers’ application programming interfaces (APIs). Many of those APIs have restrictions that inhibit data mining at scale, and while only some publishers actually provide APIs, almost all publishers make their content available on the web. Current web technologies should make it possible to harvest and mine the scholarly literature regardless of the source of publication, and without using specialised programmatic interfaces controlled by each publisher. Here we describe the tools developed to address this challenge as part of the ContentMine project.

Source: D-Lib: The ContentMine Scraping Stack: Literature-scale Content Mining with Community-maintained Collections of Declarative Scrapers

Report: Digital Scholarship and Book History

Occasionally, one finds oneself confronting the misconception that book history has nothing to do with digital scholarship. People who love print are never people who study with and about digital tools, right? You know better, I trust, but it continues to be surprising and frustrating that people across the full spectrum of these media studies make these assumptions.

And so I was delighted to be asked to co-write a “State of the Discipline” piece for Book History on exactly this relationship between book history and digital scholarship. And I’m even more delighted that the piece that Matt Kirschenbaum and I wrote is now out! Our review essay, “Digital Scholarship and Digital Studies,” takes as its argument our belief that book historians are already using digital tools and that current book production and reception is inextricably tied to digital methods.

Read the full post here.

Report: Adobe is Spying on Users, Collecting Data on Their eBook Libraries

Adobe has just given us a graphic demonstration of how not to handle security and privacy issues.

A hacker acquaintance of mine has tipped me to a huge security and privacy violation on the part of Adobe. That anonymous acquaintance was examining Adobe’s DRm for educational purposes when they noticed that Digital Editions 4, the newest version of Adobe’s Epub app, seemed to be sending an awful lot of data to Adobe’s servers.

My source told me, and I can confirm, that Adobe is tracking users in the app and uploading the data to their servers.

Read the whole thing here.

Report: What Have the Romans Ever Mapped for Us? Results from the Latin Geographic Tradition

Having recently completed our first content workpackage (CWP1), dedicated to Early Geospatial Documents from the Latin Tradition, we’d like to take this opportunity to share the annotation data that we’ve compiled so far. Overall we have completed annotating place references in 33 documents (41 if we include additional language versions of the same document). Within these documents, we’ve identified 19,880 toponyms, and were able to establish mappings to Pleiades in 15,721 cases (79%).

Source: What Have the Romans Ever Mapped for Us? Results from the Latin Geographic Tradition