From the resource: Successful non-traditional dissertations include a comic book (Nick Sousanis), a hip-hop album (A.D. Carson), code and design without written chapters (me), and the use of digital formats and methods such as a Tumblog counter-narrative (Jade E. Davis) or topic modeling (Lisa Rhody). Are you curious about using digital methods or forms to…

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From the post: I have been working on a series of blog posts on digital accessibility for the last several months. This is a topic that is near and dear to my heart, as I am a disabled student and worker in a digital world. I try to advance projects and accessibility in general, and…

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About the resource: Part of the mission of the SSRC Digital Culture program, and of Parameters as a platform, is to bring together disparate trainings and resources for scholars hoping to increase their digital literacy and familiarity with digital tools and methodologies used in social science. To that end, we compiled a list of current…

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From the resource: We love complete and nicely formatted data. It means we spend less time restructuring and poking at a sparse dataset and more quickly get to the visualization, analysis, and insights. It’s why I like to work with Census data so much. A lot of time and research is put into making sure…

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From the post: Have you ever come across a resource that you didn’t know existed, but once you find it you wonder how you ever got along without it? I had this feeling earlier this week when I came across the New York Times API. That’s right, the paper of record allows you–with a little…

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From the Resource: The programming language Python is widely used within many scientific domains nowadays and the language is readily accessible to scholars from the Humanities. Python is an excellent choice for dealing with (linguistic as well as literary) textual data, which is so typical of the Humanities. In this book you will be thoroughly…

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From the Resource: This site focuses on mapping the plot structures of interactive narratives, and in particular gamebooks – that is, playable print stories. The project data mines, analyzes, and visualizes the branching plot structures of hundreds of interactive stories, with examples from different decades, nations, and languages. Find the site here: Transverse Reading Gallery