From the Post: Some say annotation is the most important layer for charts meant for public consumption. It directs readers where to look and what’s important. But the process is not always straightforward. ChartAccent is an application slash research project that aims to make annotation easier. Plug in some data, make a chart, and do…

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From the post: Enrico Bertini, who has taught information visualization at New York University for the past few years, put up his class materials for open use. There are lecture slides, exercises, and a course diary of his own teaching experiences. Should be useful if you want to teach or learn on your own. Read…

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From the site: The cheat sheets below make it easy to learn about and use some of our favorite packages. From time to time, we will add new cheat sheets to the gallery. If you’d like us to drop you an email when we do, let us know by clicking the button to the right….

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From the announcement: A toast to our authors! Eleven new tutorials published in 2016. Twenty-sixteen was a big year for the Programming Historian. In addition to our ongoing maintenance of our existing lessons (no small feat), we’re pleased to announce that we added eleven new tutorials to our mix. Read full announcement here.

From the resource: Want to make a visual timeline, but don’t have the time to draw one manually? Or maybe you have some documents, but you’re not sure if the events they depict form a compelling timeline? TimeLineCurator quickly and automatically extracts temporal references in freeform text to generate a visual timeline…Already using TimelineJS? TimeLineCurator…

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From the resource: For the Digital Library Federation, November 10th saw the close of a joyful and self-consciously more inclusive 2016 DLF Forum, characterized by deeper critical introspection, the clarion leadership of our keynote speakers, broad sharing of best practices and the fruits of community-spirited labor, and increasing resolve to support our collective mission to advance research, learning, social justice, and the…

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From the post: I’m one of those humanities professors who is increasingly introducing technology-intensive assignments and activities into what would otherwise be more conventional, analog courses on writing and literature. And if you teach a large or largish class that involves in-class, hands-on work with digital tools, you would do well to come up with…

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