Category Archives: Editors’ Choice

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Editors’ Choice: Reuse of Digitised Content

By Melissa Terras | October 9, 2014

Over the last few months I have become increasingly interested obsessed with creative reuse of digitised cultural heritage content. We live at a time when most galleries, libraries, archives and museums are digitising collections and putting them up online to increase access, with some (such as the Rijksmuseum, LACMA, The British Library, and the Internet […]

Editors Choice: Certain English Errors May Decipher Clues To Dying Languages : NPR

Editors’ Choice: Certain English Errors May Decipher Clues To Dying Languages

By Shankar Vedantam | October 7, 2014

Linguists try to understand the nuances of languages, and how they relate to one another. A computer scientist says the English mistakes of non-native speakers can reveal something about languages. Anything you write or say has two parts to it – what you say and how you say it. Computers can now pay attention to […]

Editors’ Choice: The Forgotten Female Programmers Who Created Modern Tech : All Tech Considered : NPR

Editors’ Choice: The Forgotten Female Programmers Who Created Modern Tech

By Laura Sydell | October 7, 2014

If your image of a computer programmer is a young man, there’s a good reason: It’s true. Recently, many big tech companies revealed how few of their female employees worked in programming and technical jobs. Google had some of the highest rates: 17 percent of its technical staff is female. It wasn’t always this way. […]

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Editors Choice: Opening up Classics and the Humanities: Computation, the Homer Multitext Project and Citizen Science

By Charles Jones | October 2, 2014

From the abstract: Increasingly powerful computational methods are important for humanists not simply because they make it possible to ask new research questions but especially because computation makes it both possible — and arguably essential — to transform the relationship between humanities research and society, opening up a range of possibilities for student contributions and […]

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Editors Choice: Why I Just Asked My Students To Put Their Laptops Away…

By Clay Shirky | September 30, 2014

I teach theory and practice of social media at NYU, and am an advocate and activist for the free culture movement, so I’m a pretty unlikely candidate for internet censor, but I have just asked the students in my fall seminar to refrain from using laptops, tablets, and phones in class. I came late and […]

Creative Commons Image by Hash Milhan via Flickr

Editors’ Choice: Visualizing Early America through MapScholar and Beyond

By Jim Ambuske | September 30, 2014

Hello, DH World! As this is my first official post as a DH Grad Fellow in the Scholars’ Lab, I’d like to start it by thanking the folks in the Lab for the opportunity to join the team for this academic year. I feel really fortunate that I have the chance to hang out with […]

The Great Works of Software — The Message — Medium

Editors’ Choice: The Great Works of Software

By Paul Ford | September 23, 2014

Is it possible to propose a software canon? To enumerate great works of software that are deeply influential—that changed the nature of the code that followed? Canons emerge over time, as certain works gain in critical appreciation. But software is mutable stuff, quick to obsolesce. Only banks, governments, and your parents run the same programs […]

Creative Commons Image by Hash Milhan via Flickr

Editors’ Choice: Open Government Data: Possibilities and Problems

By Craig Bellamy | September 23, 2014

“Government 2.0 involves direct citizen engagement in conversations about government services and public policy through open access to public sector information and new Internet based technologies. It also encapsulates a way of working that is underpinned by collaboration, openness and engagement”[1] Back ground and context The Political Issues Analysis System (PIAS) project (view report .pdf)—in […]