Quinn Dombrowski and I are writing a manual on using the Drupal 7 CMS for digital humanities projects.  Titled unimaginatively Drupal for Humanists, it is meant to provide first an understanding of how to install and configure Drupal and then a series of case studies representative of Drupal’s use in humanities research and the library.

The general focus of the Junior Fellows Program is on increasing access to the collections and an awareness of the Library’s copyright, legal and special collections and digital initiatives.  In the past, projects have been developed to make the collections  better known and accessible to researchers including scholars, students, teachers, knowledge creators, and the general public. Interns help the Library expose unprocessed collections, participate in digital projects, provide additional services to Congress and the public, and make our collections more immediately accessible to scholars. Interns work under the direction of Library curators and specialists in various divisions. In the past, summer interns have identified hundreds of historical, literary, artistic, cinematic and musical gems representing rich cultural, creative, and intellectual resources. United States citizens currently enrolled in undergraduate or graduate school.

Today we’re delighted to announce that Zotero 3.0 has officially arrived Zotero 3.0 marks a major departure from previous versions, most notably with the new ability run outside the Firefox browser. Available for Mac, Windows, and Linux, this standalone version of Zotero contains all the great functionality of the old Firefox-based Zotero but now enables users to integrate Zotero into browsers other than Firefox like Google Chrome and Apple Safari. To all you Firefox lovers out there, no need to worry! Zotero continues to work within Firefox, and even if you choose to run the standalone version, it will talk to Firefox, too.

“From margin to mainstream: mobile technologies transforming lives and libraries”

24-26 September 2012 at the Open University, UK

Mobile technology has transformed so many aspects of our lives: how we work, how we communicate, how we study and how we play. Since the first successful M-libraries conference in 2007, libraries around the world have made huge advances in harnessing the technology to improve and enhance their services.  The Fourth international conference will bring together researchers, technical developers, managers, educators, and library practitioners to review achievements to date and consider the creative challenges and opportunities ahead.

Following the University’s acquisition of the Cardiff Rare Books Collection, the School of English, Communication and Philosophy at Cardiff University invites applications for a Professorship in English Literature, tenable from 1st September 2012, or as soon as possible thereafter. The successful candidate will be a leading expert in the History of the Book and Material Culture and in Digital Humanities, with an international portfolio of research publications in English Literature. You will be expected to make a substantial contribution to the School’s Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research by pioneering the development of initiatives relating to the Rare Books Collection.

Intended for long-form scholarship, [Scalar] particularly facilitates work with visual materials and dynamic media (such as video and audio)… it enables writers to assemble content from multiple sources and juxtapose them with their own compositions.

Switch to OpenStreetMap and discover how you can build beautiful maps from the world’s best map data. We give you the data for free; you can make any map you like with it. Or benefit from the expertise of those already using OpenStreetMap. Host it on your hardware, or elsewhere. You have control. switch2osm.org explains how to make the switch – from first principles to technical how-tos.