The Humanities and Technology Camp (THATCamp) has announced the program is sunsetting and is hosting a retrospective on the site. I’m crossposting some quick reflections there and here.  I think I’ve been to at least 9 THATCamps. I was at the the first one at CHNM in 2008. I missed 2009. But I was at the CHNM ones…

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Today we’re excited to officially launch the first phase of Mapping the Gay Guides. What is Mapping the Gay Guides? Mapping the Gay Guides (MGG) is a digital mapping project that aims to understand often ignored queer geographies using the Damron Address Books, an early but longstanding travel guide aimed at gay men since the early 1960s. Similar…

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[Provisional draft notes shared as a prompt for future research group discussion] My interest in the sociology of texts, transmedia storytelling and the role of materiality in the reading/collecting/reception/user experience, particularly in the case of comic book cultures, originally found a welcoming conceptual framework within the digital humanities. Recently, my interest has been evolving towards…

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Digital Humanities Now will be taking a break until the end of January. On behalf of the DHNow staff, thank you for another great semester! To our generous volunteer editors-at-large, thank you for dedicating your time and expertise. Your participation makes DHNow possible. This semester’s editors-at-large included: Dan Howlett, Dana Meyer, Kris Stinson, Teresa Donoso, Sarah Fay, Jajwalya Karajgikar, Morgan Lemmer-Webber,…

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Bill Caraher has recently been considering the nature of ‘legacy data’ in archaeology (Caraher 2019) (with a commentary by Andrew Reinhard). Amongst other things, he suggests there has been a shift from paper-based archives designed with an emphasis on the future to digital archives which often seem more concerned with present utility. Coincidentally, Bill’s post…

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The Shakespeare and Company Project is based on the Sylvia Beach papers at Princeton University Library. Logbooks and lending library cards trace members’ engagement with Beach’s famous lending library in Paris. Members included literary luminaries Gertrude Stein, James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, and Simone de Beauvoir, as well as students, businessmen, and French girls with English governesses….

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